Etymology
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honker (n.)
"that which honks," especially the wild goose of North America, agent noun from honk (v.).
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Georgian (adj.)
1855 in reference to the reigns of the first four kings George of England (1714-1830), especially in reference to the decorative style of the era of the first two. From c. 1600 as "pertaining to Georgia" in the Caucasus; 1762 as "pertaining to Georgia" in America; the noun in this sense is c. 1400 (Caucasus), 1741 (America).
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AOL 
dominant online service of the late 1990s, initialism (acronym) of America Online, a company name attested from late 1989.
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paca (n.)

large rodent of Central and South America, 1650s, from Spanish, from Tupi (Brazil) paca, the native name for it.

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Andes 

great mountain system along the Pacific coast of South America, from Quechua (Inca) andi "high crest." Related: Andean.

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viburnum (n.)
genus of shrubs widespread in Eurasia and North America, the wayfaring-tree, 1731, from Latin viburnum, which is said to be probably an Etruscan word.
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teonanacatl (n.)
native name for a hallucinogenic fungi (Psilocybe mexicana) found in Central America, 1875, from Nahuatl (Aztecan), from teotl "god" + nancatl "mushroom."
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Peru 

ancient realm in northwestern South America, later a Spanish viceroyalty, since 1821 an independent republic, from Spanish Peru, said to be from Quechua (Inca) pelu "river." Related: Peruvian.

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manioc (n.)

"the cassava plant or its product," an important food staple in tropical America, 1560s, from Tupi manioch, mandioca, name for the root of the cassava.

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millionaire (n.)

"a person worth a million dollars, pounds, francs, etc.," 1821, from French millionnaire (1762); see million. The first in America is said to have been John Jacob Astor (1763-1848).

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