Etymology
Advertisement
vary (v.)
mid-14c. (transitive); late 14c. (intransitive), from Old French variier "be changed, go astray; change, alter, transform" and directly from Latin variare "change, alter, make different," from varius "varied, different, spotted;" perhaps related to varus "bent, crooked, knock-kneed," and varix "varicose vein," and, more distantly, to Old English wearte "wart," Swedish varbulde "pus swelling," Latin verruca "wart." Related: Varied; varying.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
brainwashing (n.)
"attempt to alter or control the thoughts and beliefs of another person against his will by psychological techniques," 1950, a literal translation of Chinese xi nao. A term from the Korean War.
Related entries & more 
emend (v.)
"remove faults from, alter for the better," c. 1400, from Latin emendare "to free from fault, correct, improve, revise," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + mendum (nominative menda) "fault, blemish" (see amend). Related: Emended; emending.
Related entries & more 
metamorphose (v.)

"to change into a different form, alter or modify the shape or character of," 1570s, from French métamorphoser (16c.), from métamorphose (n.), from Latin metamorphosis (see metamorphosis). Related: Metamorphosed. The Greek verb was metamorphoun.

Related entries & more 
interpolation (n.)
1610s, "act of interpolating;" 1670s, "that which is interpolated," from French interpolation (17c.) or directly from Latin interpolationem (nominative interpolatio), noun of action from past participle stem of interpolare "to alter; falsify" (see interpolate).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
doctor (v.)

1590s, "to confer the degree of doctor on," from doctor (n.). Meaning "to treat as a doctor, administer medical treatment to" is from 1712; sense of "alter, disguise for the purpose of deception, falsify" is from 1774. Related: Doctored; doctoring.

Related entries & more 
changeable (adj.)

mid-13c., "unstable, inconstant, unreliable," from Old French changeable "inconstant," from changier "to alter; exchange; to switch" (see change (v.)) + -able (see -able). Meaning "subject to variation" is from late 14c. Related: Changeably; changeability.

Related entries & more 
reposition (v.)

also re-position, 1859, "to put (something) in a new or adjusted position," from re- "again" + position (v.). Intransitive sense of "adjust or alter one's position" is by 1947. Related: Repositioned; repositioning.

Related entries & more 
denature (v.)

"alter (something) so as to change its nature," 1878, from French dénaturer (Old French desnaturer "change the nature of; make unnatural"); see de- + nature. Earlier it meant "to make unnatural" (1680s). Earlier in the modern sense of denature was denaturalize (1812). Related: Denatured.

Related entries & more 
codicil (n.)

"a writing added to a will to explain, alter, add to, or revoke original terms," early 15c., from Latin codicillus "a short writing, a small writing tablet," diminutive of codex (genitive codicis) "book" (see code (n.)). Related: Codicillary.

Related entries & more 

Page 3