Etymology
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sigma 
18th letter of the Greek alphabet, corresponding to Latin S, a metathesis of Hebrew samekh. In uncial writing, shaped like an S or a C.
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Cyrillic 

1842, in reference to the alphabet adopted by Slavic people belonging to the Eastern Church, from St. Cyril, 9c. apostle of the Slavs, who supposedly invented it. The alphabet replaced earlier Glagolitic. The name Cyril is Late Latin Cyrillus, from Greek Kyrillos, literally "lordly, masterful," related to kyrios "lord, master" (see church).

It is believed to have superseded the Glagolitic as being easier both for the copyist to write and for the foreigner to acquire. Some of its signs are modified from the Glagolitic, but those which Greek and Slavic have in common are taken from the Greek. It was brought into general use by St. Cyril's pupil, Clement, first bishop of Bulgaria. The Russian alphabet is a slight modification of it. [Century Dictionary]
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ell (n.2)
name of the letter -L- in Latin; in reference to a type of building, 1773, American English; so called for resemblance to the shape of the alphabet letter.
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leet (n.2)
ASCII alternative alphabet used mostly in internet chat, by 1997, derived from elite (adj.), and sometimes the word also was used as an adjective in that sense in online gaming.
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jot (n.)
"the least part of anything," 1520s, from Latin iota, from Greek iota "the letter -i-," the smallest letter in the Greek alphabet, also "the least part of anything" (see iota). Usually (and originally) with tittle, from Matthew v.18.
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transliteration (n.)
"rendering of the letters of one alphabet by the equivalents of another," 1835, from trans- "across" (see trans-) + Latin littera (also litera) "letter, character" (see letter (n.)).
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transliterate (v.)
"to write a word in the characters of another alphabet," 1849, from trans- "across" + Latin littera (also litera) "letter, character" (see letter (n.)). Related: Transliterated; transliterating.
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horn-book (n.)
also hornbook, 1580s, teaching tool consisting of a page with the alphabet, numerals, etc. written on it, fixed to a frame, and covered with transparent horn;" from horn (n.) + book (n.).
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omicron (n.)

15th letter of the Greek alphabet, c. 1400, literally "small 'o,' " from o + Greek (s)mikros "small" (see micro-). So called because the vowel was "short" in ancient Greek. Compare omega.

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literary (adj.)
1640s, "pertaining to alphabet letters," from French littéraire, from Latin literarius/litterarius "belonging to letters or learning," from littera/litera "alphabetic letter" (see letter (n.1)). Meaning "pertaining to literature" is attested from 1737. Related: Literariness.
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