Etymology
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bean bag (n.)

also bean-bag, "bag filled with beans," 1871 as an object in children's games, 1969 in reference to a type of chair. From bean (n.) + bag (n.).

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barbed wire (n.)

also barb wire, "fencing wire with sharp edges or points," 1863, American English; see barb (n.) + wire (n.). Originally for the restraint of animals.

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pipe dream (n.)

the sort of improbable fantasy one has while smoking opium, 1870, from pipe (n.1) in the smoking sense + dream (n.). Old English pipdream meant "piping," from dream in the sense of "music."

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point man (n.)

"one who leads a military patrol in formation in a jungle, etc.," 1944, said to be from point (n.) in military sense of "small leading party of an advance guard" (1580s) + man (n.). A more literal sense also is possible. Point (n.) in U.S. also meant "position at the front of a herd of cattle," and pointman in this sense is attested by 1903.

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bow tie (n.)

"necktie tied in the form of a bow or a knot with two loops," by 1887, from bow (n.) in the sense "ribbon or other fabric tied in a bow-knot" (by 1874) + tie (n.).

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pig iron (n.)

"iron in pigs," as it comes from a blast furnace, iron that has been run while molten into a mold in sand, 1660s; see pig (n.2) + iron (n.).

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leg up (n.)

"an aid, a boost," 1837, from leg (n.) + up (adv.).

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straw man (n.)

1590s, "doll or scarecrow made of bound straw," from straw (n.) + man (n.). Figuratively, in debates, by 1896, from man of straw "an easily refuted imaginary opponent in an argument," which is recorded from 1620s.

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light bulb (n.)

also lightbulb, 1884, from light (n.) + bulb (n.). Changing one as figurative of something easy to do is from 1920s; jokes about how many of a certain type it takes to change one date from 1971.

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sub-machine-gun (n.)

"light, portable machine gun," 1926, from sub- + machine-gun (n.).

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