Etymology
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bedevil (v.)
1768, "to treat diabolically, abuse," from be- + verbal use of devil (q.v.). Meaning "to mischievously confuse" is from 1755; that of "to drive frantic" is from 1823. Related: Bedeviled (1570s in a literal sense, "possessed"); bedeviling.
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unlawful (adj.)
"contrary to law, illegal," c. 1300, from un- (1) "not" + lawful. Unlawful assembly is recorded in statutes from late 15c. Related: Unlawfully. Old English had a noun unlagu ("unlaw") "illegal action, abuse of law."
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whipper-snapper (n.)
also whippersnapper, 1670s, apparently a "jingling extension" [OED] of *whip-snapper "a cracker of whips," or perhaps an alteration of snipper-snapper (1580s). Compare also late 16c. whipperginnie, a term of abuse for a woman.
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laceration (n.)

1590s, "act of lacerating;" 1630s, "breach or rend made by tearing;" from French lacération, from Latin lacerationem (nominative laceratio) "a tearing, rending, mutilation," noun of action from past-participle stem of lacerare "tear to pieces, mangle; slander, abuse" (see lacerate).

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vexation (n.)
c. 1400, from Old French vexacion "abuse, harassment; insult, affront," or directly from Latin vexationem (nominative vexatio) "annoyance, harassing; distress, trouble," noun of action from past participle stem of vexare "to harass, trouble" (see vex).
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lousy (adj.)
mid-14c., lousi, "infested with lice," from louse (n.) + -y (2). Figurative use as a generic adjective of abuse dates from late 14c.; sense of "swarming with" (money, etc.) is American English slang from 1843. Related: Lousiness.
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sheeney (n.)

"a Jew," 1816, of unknown origin. OED points to Russian zhid, Polish żyd, Czech zid "a Jew." Opprobrious by late 19c. and subsequently a vulgar term of abuse, but it was used before c. 1870 by Jews and Gentiles without apparent intent of insult.

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fucker (n.)

1590s, "one who copulates," agent noun from fuck (v.). By 1893 as a general term of abuse (or admiration).

DUCK F-CK-R. The man who has the care of the poultry on board a ſhip of war. ["Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue," 1796]
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bad-mouth (v.)
"abuse (someone) verbally," 1941, probably ultimately from noun phrase bad mouth (1835), in African-American vernacular, "a curse, spell," translating an idiom found in African and West Indian languages. See bad (adj.) + mouth (n.). Related: Bad-mouthed; bad-mouthing.
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misuse (v.)

late 14c., misusen, "use or treat improperly;" from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + use (v.) and in part from Old French mesuser (Modern French méuser), from mis- (2). Meaning "abuse, treat badly, subject to ill-treatment" is attested from 1530s. Related: Misused; misusing; misusage.

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