Etymology
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self-heal (n.)

late Old English sylfhele, applied to several plants held to have remarkable healing properties; see self- + heal (v.). So called for supposedly enabling one to heal without a physician's aid.

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parachute (v.)

"to descend or convey by or as if by the aid of a parachute," 1807, from parachute (n.). Marked "rare" in Century Dictionary (1895); it became more common 20c. Related: Parachuted; parachuting.

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self-confidence (n.)

"confidence of one's own judgment or ability, reliance on one's own powers without other aid," 1650s, a back-formation from self-confident, or else from self- + confidence.

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hearing (n.)
early 13c., "perception of sound by ear, action of listening," verbal noun from hear (v.). Meaning "a listening to evidence in a court of law" is from 1570s. Hearing-aid is from 1908.
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tonic (n.1)
"a tonic medicine," 1799, from tonic (adj.). From 1873 (in gin and tonic) as short for tonic water (1861 as a commercial product, water infused with quinine), so called because held to aid digestion and stimulate appetite.
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auxiliary (adj.)
"assisting, giving support," hence "subsidiary, additional," c. 1600, from Latin auxiliaris "helpful, aiding," from auxilium "aid, help, support," related to auctus, past participle of augere "to increase," from PIE root *aug- (1) "to increase."
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Pepsi-Cola 
U.S. patent filed Sept. 23, 1902, by Caleb D. Bradham (1867-1934), pharmacist and drugstore owner of New Bern, N.C., probably from pepsin; early Pepsi ads tout it as a digestive aid.
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palatal (adj.)

1728, of sounds, "uttered by the aid of the palate," from palate + -al (1). By 1786 as "of or pertaining to the roof of the mouth." As a noun, "a sound or letter usually produced by the upper surface of the tongue against a part of the palate," by 1762.

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dial (v.)

1650s, "to work with aid of a dial or compass; measure with or as with a dial," from dial (n.). Sense of "rotate the dial plate of a telephone to indicate the number to which a connection is to be established" is from 1921. Related: Dialed; dialing.

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reckoner (n.)

c. 1200, rekenere, "one who keeps accounts or computes," agent noun from reckon (v.). Later especially "an aid in reckoning, something that assists a person to reckon accounts;" especially "book of tables used in calculation," often known as a ready reckoner (1757).

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