Etymology
Advertisement
posterior (adj.)

1530s, "later in time," from Latin posterior "after, later, behind," comparative of posterus "coming after, subsequent," from post "after" (see post-). Meaning "situated behind, later in position than another or others" is from 1630s. Related: Posterial.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
post hoc 
Latin, "after this." Especially in post hoc, ergo propter hoc, logical fallacy, literally "after this, therefore because of this."
Related entries & more 
postposition (n.)

"act of placing after," 1630s, noun of action from Latin postponere "put after; esteem less; postpone" from post "after" (see post-) + ponere "to put, place" (see position (n.)). Perhaps modeled on French postposition. Related: Postposit (v., 1660s); postpositive; postpositional.

Related entries & more 
post meridiem 

"after noon, occurring after the sun has passed the meridian," applied to the time between noon and midnight, 1640s, Latin, from post "after" (see post-) + accusative of meridies "midday, noon" (see meridian).

Related entries & more 
postscribe (v.)

"write after, write as a postscript," 1610s, a back-formation from postscript or else from Latin postscribere "write after."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
jilt (v.)
"to deceive (especially after holding out hopes), discard after encouraging," 1670s; earlier "to cheat, trick" (1660s); of uncertain origin (see jilt (n.)). Related: Jilted; jilting.
Related entries & more 
post-Christian (adj.)

by 1807 as "after the lifetime of Christ," from post- + Christ + -ian; by 1929 as "after the decline or rejection of Christianity," from Christian.

Related entries & more 
perinatal (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the period just before and just after birth (commonly reckoned at from 1 to 4 weeks before and after birth), 1952, from peri- + natal.

Related entries & more 
postscript (n.)

"an addition made to a written or printed composition," especially a paragraph added to a letter which already has been concluded and signed by the writer, 1550s, from Latin post scriptum "written after" (compare postscribere "to write after"), from post "after" (see post-) + neuter past participle of scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut").

Related entries & more 
post-partum (adj.)

also postpartum, 1837, "occurring after the birth of a child," from Latin post partum "after birth," from post "after" (see post-) + accusative of partus "a bearing, a bringing forth," from partus, past participle of parire "to bring forth, bear, produce, create; bring about, accomplish" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, bring forth"). Phrase post-partum depression is attested by 1929.

Related entries & more 

Page 3