Etymology
Advertisement
equivocate (v.)

"use words of a doubtful signification, express one's opinions in terms which admit of different interpretations," early 15c., equivocaten, from Medieval Latin equivocatus, past participle of equivocare "to call by the same name, be called by the same name, have the same sound," from Late Latin aequivocus "of identical sound" (see equivocation). Related: Equivocated; equivocating.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
accept (v.)
Origin and meaning of accept
late 14c., "to take what is offered; admit and agree to (a proposal, etc.)," from Old French accepter (14c.) or directly from Latin acceptare "take or receive willingly," frequentative of accipere "receive, get without effort," from ad "to" (see ad-) + capere "to take," from PIE root *kap- "to grasp." Related: Accepted; accepting.
Related entries & more 
cabbala (n.)

"Jewish mystic philosophy," 1520s, also quabbalah, etc., from Medieval Latin cabbala, from Mishnaic Hebrew qabbalah "reception, received lore, tradition," especially "tradition of mystical interpretation of the Old Testament," from qibbel "to receive, admit, accept." Compare Arabic qabala "he received, accepted." Hence "any secret or esoteric science." Related: Cabbalist.

Related entries & more 
admissible (adj.)

1610s, "allowable," from French admissible, from past participle stem of Latin admittere "allow to enter, admit, give entrance," from ad "to" (see ad-) + mittere "let go, send" (see mission). Meaning "capable of being allowed entrance" is from 1775; specific sense of "capable of being used in a legal decision or judicial investigation" is recorded from 1849.

Related entries & more 
comport (v.)

late 14c., "to bear, endure (grief, pain, etc.; sense now obsolete), from Old French comporter "endure, admit of, allow; behave" (13c.) and directly from Latin comportare "to bring together, collect," from com "with, together" (see com-) + portare "to carry" (from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over").

Meaning "to agree, accord, be suitable" (with with) is from 1580s. Meaning "to behave, conduct" (with a reflexive pronoun) is from 1610s. Related: Comported; comporting.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
susceptible (adj.)

c. 1600, from Late Latin susceptibilis "capable, sustainable, susceptible," from Latin suscept-, past-participle stem of suscipere "to take, catch, take up, lift up; receive, admit; submit to; sustain, support, bear; acknowledge, accept," from sub "up from under" (see sub-) + capere "to take," from PIE root *kap- "to grasp." Susceptive in the same sense is recorded from early 15c. Related: Susceptibly.

Related entries & more 
conclusive (adj.)

1610s, "occurring at the end," from French conclusif, from Late Latin conclusivus, from conclus-, past participle stem of Latin concludere "to shut up, enclose," from assimilated form of com "together" (see con-) + -cludere, combining form of claudere "to shut" (see close (v.)). Meaning "definitive, decisive, convincing, being so forcible as not to admit of contradiction" (on the notion of "leading to a logical conclusion," and thus putting an end to debate) is from 1640s. Related: Conclusiveness.

Related entries & more 
naturalize (v.)

1550s, "admit (an alien) to rights of a citizen" (implied in naturalized), from natural (adj.) in its etymological sense of "by birth" + -ize. In some instances from French naturaliser. Of words or expressions, "adopt as native or vernacular," 1590s. Of plants or animals, "introduce and acclimatize in places or situations where they are not indigenous," by 1708. Related: Naturalizing.

Related entries & more 
avow (v.)
c. 1300, "uphold, support, approve; stand by, back up (someone); declare openly, take sides openly, affirm;" mid-14c. "admit openly," from Anglo-French avouer, Old French avoer "acknowledge, accept, recognize," especially as a protector (12c., Modern French avouer), from Latin advocare "to call, summon, invite" (see advocate (n.)). A synonym of avouch (q.v.), which tends to contain the more technical, legal aspect of the word. Related: Avowed; avowing.
Related entries & more 
shoppe (n.)

one of several Middle English variations of shop (n.). It appears in Chaucer. Noted by 1918 as an antiquarian affectation in U.S. commercial establishments.

YE EAT SHOPPE
I admit that the name is against it. As a matter of fact, 732 Eighth Avenue is nothing more nor less than a good old-fashioned midnight lunch-room camouflaged by a flossy title. [Helen Worden Erskine, "The Real New York," 1933]
Related entries & more 

Page 3