Etymology
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Hooverville 
1933, American English, from U.S. president Herbert C. Hoover (1874-1964), who was in office when the Depression began, + common place-name ending -ville. Earlier his name was the basis of Hooverize "economize on food" (1917) from his role as wartime head of the U.S. Food Administration.
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cure (n.1)

c. 1300, "care, heed," from Latin cura "care, concern, trouble," with many figurative extensions over time such as "study; administration; office of a parish priest; a mistress," and also "means of healing, successful remedial treatment of a disease" (late 14c.), from Old Latin coira-, a noun of unknown origin. Meaning "medical care" is late 14c.

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judicial (adj.)
late 14c., "of or pertaining to a judge; pertaining to the administration of justice," from Latin iudicalis "of or belonging to a court of justice," from iudicium "judgment, decision of a court of justice," also the court itself, from iudex "a judge," a compound of ius "right, law" (see just (adj.)) + root of dicere "to say" (from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly"). Related: Judicially.
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governance (n.)
late 14c., "act or manner of governing," from Old French governance "government, rule, administration; (rule of) conduct" (Modern French gouvernance), from governer "to govern, rule, command" (see govern). Fowler writes that the word "has now the dignity of incipient archaism," but it might continue useful in its original sense as government comes to mean primarily "the governing power in a state."
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justification (n.)

late 14c., "administration of justice," from Late Latin iustificationem (nominative iustificatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of iustificare "act justly toward; make just" (see justify). Meaning "action of justifying, showing something to be just or right" is from late 15c. Theological sense "act by which the soul is reconciled to God" is from 1520s. Meaning "act of adjusting or making exact" in typography is from 1670s.

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diocese (n.)

"district and population under the pastoral care of a bishop,"  mid-14c., from Old French diocese (13c., Modern French diocèse), from Late Latin diocesis, in the Roman Empire "a governor's jurisdiction, a subdivision of a prefecture containing a number of provinces," later, in Church Latin, "a bishop's jurisdiction," from Greek dioikesis "government, administration; province," originally "economy, housekeeping," from dioikein "control, govern, administer, manage a house," from dia "thoroughly" (see dia-) + oikos "house" (from PIE root *weik- (1) "clan").

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photo (n.)

1860, a colloquial shortening of photograph. The verb is by 1865, from the noun. Photo-finish, of a race that ends with two or more competitors crossing the finishing line at nearly the same time (so a photograph taken at the finish line at the moment of crossing is the only way to determine who won) is attested from 1936. Photo opportunity "arranged opportunity to take a photograph of a notable person or event" is from 1974, said to be a coinage of the Nixon Administration.

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government (n.)

late 14c., "act of governing or ruling;" 1550s, "system by which a thing is governed" (especially a state), from Old French governement "control, direction, administration" (Modern French gouvernement), from governer "to steer, be at the helm of; govern, rule, command, direct," from Latin gubernare "to direct, rule, guide, govern," originally "to steer, to pilot"(see govern). Meaning "governing power" in a given place is from 1702. Compare governance.

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privatization (n.)

"policy or process of making private as opposed to public," 1924, in reference to German economic policies in the crisis after World War I, from private (adj.) + -ization. Re-privatisation is attested by 1939.

Hugo Stinnes repeatedly demanded the privatization of the railroads, alleging that they could never function satisfactorily and profitably under bureaucratic administration. [United News article in Miami Herald, April 28, 1924]
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pluralism (n.)

1818, as a term in church administration, "the holding by one person of two or more offices at the same time," from plural + -ism. Attested from 1882 as a term in philosophy for a theory which recognizes more than one ultimate principle. In political science, attested from 1919 (in Harold J. Laski) in the sense of "theory which opposes monolithic state power." General sense of "toleration of diversity within a society or state" is from 1933. Related: Pluralist (1620s, in the church sense); pluralistic.

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