Etymology
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agglutinate (v.)
1580s, "unite or cause to adhere," from Latin agglutinatus, past participle of agglutinare "fasten with glue," from ad "to" (see ad-) + glutinare "to glue," from gluten "glue," from PIE *glei- (see glue (n.)). Related: Agglutinated; agglutinating. Perhaps suggested by the earlier use of the same word in English as a past-participle adjective (1540s) "united as by glue," from the Latin past participle.
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adipose (adj.)
"pertaining to fat, fatty," 1743, from Modern Latin adiposus "fatty," from Latin adipem (nominative adeps, genitive adipis) "soft fat of animals, fat, lard," which is said to be from Greek aleipha "unguent, fat, anything used for smearing," a word related to lipos "grease, fat," from PIE root *leip- "to stick, adhere," also used to form words for "fat." With change of -l- to -d- "prob. due to Umbrian influence" [Klein]. But it could as well be a native Italic formation from the same roots, *ad-leip-a "sticking onto."
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coherence (n.)

1580s, "suitable connection or dependence, consistency" (in narrative or argument), also more literally "act or state of sticking or cleaving of one thing to another," from French cohérence (16c.), from Latin cohaerentia, abstract noun from cohaerentem(nominative cohaerens), present participle of cohaerere "to stick together, be coherent," from assimilated form of com "together" (see co-) + haerere "to adhere, stick" (see hesitation). Related: Coherency.

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flounce (v.)
1540s, "to dash, plunge, flop," perhaps from Scandinavian (compare dialectal Swedish flunsa "to plunge," Norwegian flunsa "to hurry, work hurriedly," but first record of these is 200 years later than the English word), said to be of imitative origin. Spelling likely influenced by bounce. Notions of "anger, impatience" began to adhere to the word 18c. Related: Flounced; flouncing. As a noun from 1580s in reference to a sudden fling or turn of the body; by mid-18c. especially as expressing impatience or disdain.
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*leip- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to stick, adhere; fat."

It forms all or part of: adipose; beleave; delay; leave (v.); lebensraum; life; liparo-; lipo- (1) "fat;" lipoma; liposuction; lively; live (v.); liver (n.1) "secreting organ of the body;" Olaf; relay.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek liparein "to persist, persevere," aleiphein "anoint with oil," lipos "fat;" Old English lifer "liver," læfan "to allow to remain."
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delay (v.)

c. 1300, delaien, "to put off, postpone;" late 14c., "to put off or hinder for a time," from Old French delaiier, from de- "away, from" (see de-) + laier "leave, let." This is perhaps a variant of Old French laissier, from Latin laxare "slacken, undo" (see lax). But Watkins has it from Frankish *laibjan, from a Proto-Germanic causative form of PIE root *leip- "to stick, adhere." Intransitive sense of "linger, move slowly" is from c. 1500. Related: Delayed; delaying.

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liver (n.1)

secreting organ of the body, Old English lifer, from Proto-Germanic *librn (source also of Old Norse lifr, Old Frisian livere, Middle Dutch levere, Dutch lever, Old High German lebara, German Leber "liver"), perhaps from PIE root *leip- "to stick, adhere," also used to form words for "fat."

Formerly believed to be the body's blood-producing organ; in medieval times it rivaled the heart as the supposed seat of love and passion. Hence lily-livered, a white (that is, bloodless) liver being supposed a sign of cowardice, Shakespeare's pigeon-livered, etc. Liver-spots, once thought to be caused by a dysfunction of the organ, is attested from 1730.

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adherent (n.)
early 15c., "follower, supporter, one who upholds (a leader, cause, etc.)," from Old French adherent or directly from Latin adhaerentem (nominative adhaerens), present participle of adhaerere "stick to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + haerere "to stick" (see hesitation). Meaning "adhesive substance" is from 1912.
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adherent (adj.)
late 14c., "sticking, clinging to, adhesive," from Old French adherent or directly from Latin adhaerentem (nominative adhaerens), present participle of adhaerere "stick to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + haerere "to stick" (past participle haesus; see hesitation).
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adherence (n.)

mid-15c., "steady attachment of the mind or feelings to a person, cause, belief, etc.," from Old French adhérence, from Medieval Latin adhaerentia, abstract noun from Latin adhaerent-, stem of adhaerens, present participle of adhaerare "stick to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + haerere "to stick" (see hesitation). Rarely in a physical sense, adhesion being the usual word for that.

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