Etymology
Advertisement
increment (n.)
mid-15c., "act or process of increasing," from Latin incrementum "growth, increase; an addition," from stem of increscere "to grow in or upon" (see increase (v.)). Meaning "amount of increase" first attested 1630s.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
epilogue (n.)

early 15c., epiloge, from Old French epilogue (13c.), from Latin epilogus, from Greek epilogos "a conclusion, conclusion of a speech, inference," from epi "upon, in addition" (see epi-) + logos "a speaking" (see -logy). Earliest English sense was theatrical.

Related entries & more 
connotate (v.)

"to signify secondarily," 1590s, from Medieval Latin connotatus, past participle of connotare "signify in addition to the main meaning," a term in logic (see connotation). It is now obsolete, replaced by connote.

Related entries & more 
resultant (n.)

mid-15c., in mathematics, "the total or sum, the sum of an addition or product of a multiplication," from Medieval Latin resultantem (nominative resultans), present participle of resultare "to result" (see result (v.)). Sense in mechanics is from 1815.

Related entries & more 
intercalation (n.)
1570s, from Latin intercalationem (nominative intercalatio) "insertion of an intercalary day," noun of action from past participle stem of intercalare "proclaim an intercalary day" (see intercalate). The general sense "insertion of any addition into an existing series" is from 1640s.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
supervene (v.)
1640s, "come as something additional," from Latin supervenire "come on top of, come in addition to, come after, follow upon," from super "over, upon" (see super-) + venire "to come," from a suffixed form of PIE root *gwa- "to go, come." Related: Supervened; supervening.
Related entries & more 
precipitate (n.)

1560s, in chemistry, "any substance which, having been dissolved in a fluid, falls to the bottom of the vessel on the addition of some other substance producing decomposition of the compound," probably a back formation from precipitation. In meteorology, "moisture condensed from vapor by cooling and deposited as rain, etc.," by 1832.

Related entries & more 
episode (n.)

1670s, "commentary between two choric songs in a Greek tragedy," also "an incidental narrative or digression within a story, poem, etc.," from French épisode or directly from Greek epeisodion "an episode," literally "an addition," noun use of neuter of epeisodios "coming in besides," from epi "in addition" (see epi-) + eisodos "a coming in, entrance" (from PIE root *en "in").

The second element is a compound of eis "into" + hodos "a way, path; a journey; a method, system," a word of uncertain origin (see Exodus). Transferred sense of "outstanding incident, experience" first recorded in English 1773. Transferred by 1930s to individual broadcasts of serial radio programs.

Related entries & more 
also (adv., conj.)

Old English eallswa "just as, even as, as if, so as, likewise," contraction of eal swa, from all "altogether" + so. Originally an emphatic form of so. The sense of "wholly so" weakened to "in addition to, in the same way," replacing eke. Used in Old English to introduce a sequel to a preceding statement, "and so, then, therefore." Used from c. 1200 in connecting sentences, "in addition, moreover." The compound has parallel forms in German also, Dutch alzoo. English as is a shortened form of it.

Early ME has the phrase as well as the compound. The reduced forms alse, als, as gradually become established in certain constructions, the fuller also in others .... The clear distinction between also and as is not attained until the 15th century. [Middle English Compendium, University of Michigan]
Related entries & more 
excrescent (adj.)

mid-15c., "resulting from addition, greater," from Latin excrescentem (nominative excrescens), present participle of excrescere "grow out, grow up," from ex "out" (see ex-) + crescere "to grow" (from PIE root *ker- (2) "to grow"). From c. 1600 as "growing out of something else," especially abnormally or superfluously.

Related entries & more 

Page 3