Etymology
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adherent (adj.)
late 14c., "sticking, clinging to, adhesive," from Old French adherent or directly from Latin adhaerentem (nominative adhaerens), present participle of adhaerere "stick to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + haerere "to stick" (past participle haesus; see hesitation).
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amontillado (n.)
variety of sherry wine, 1825, from Spanish amontillado, from a "from" (from Latin ad; see ad-) + Montilla, name of a town in the province of Cordova. Formerly the name of a regional wine.
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afforest (v.)
"convert to forest" (especially for hunting grounds), c. 1500, from Anglo-Latin afforestare, from assimilated form of Latin ad "to" (see ad-) + Medieval Latin forestis (see forest (n.)). Related: Afforestation.
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adherent (n.)
early 15c., "follower, supporter, one who upholds (a leader, cause, etc.)," from Old French adherent or directly from Latin adhaerentem (nominative adhaerens), present participle of adhaerere "stick to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + haerere "to stick" (see hesitation). Meaning "adhesive substance" is from 1912.
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adit (n.)
"entrance," especially "horizontal mine excavation," c. 1600, from Latin aditus "an approach, an entrance; a going to or drawing near," from past participle stem of adire "to approach," from ad "to" (see ad-) + ire (past participle itus) "to go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go").
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arrondissement (n.)
"administrative subdivision of a French department," 1807, from French, literally "a rounding," from stem of arrondir "to make round," from a- "to" (see ad-) + rond "round" (see round (adj.)). They were created during the Revolution.
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adagio (adv.)

c. 1746, in music, "slowly, leisurely and gracefully," Italian, a contraction of ad agio, from ad "to, at" (see ad-) + agio "leisure," from Vulgar Latin *adiacens, present participle of adiacere "to lie at, to lie near" (compare adjacent). In noun sense of "a slow movement," first attested 1784.

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affricative (n.)
in phonetics, 1879 (perhaps from German); the elements are -ive + Latin affricat-, past participle stem of affricare "rub against," from assimilated form of ad "to" (see ad-) + fricare "to rub" (see friction).
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arroyo (n.)

"watercourse, dry stream bed," 1845, a California word, from American Spanish, in Spanish, "rivulet, small stream," perhaps from Latin arrugia "shaft or pit in a gold mine," which is apparently a compound of ad "to" (see ad-) + ruga "a wrinkle" (see rugae).

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adjacence (n.)

c. 1600, from Medieval Latin adjacentia, abstract noun from Latin adiacens "lying at," present participle of adiacere "lie at, border upon, lie near," from ad "to" (see ad-) + iacēre "to lie, rest," related to iacere "to throw; lay ('cast (oneself) down')," from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel." 

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