Etymology
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discount (v.)

1620s, "reckon as an abatement or deduction" (a sense now obsolete), from Old French desconter "reckon off, account back" (13c., Modern French décompter), from Medieval Latin discomputare, from dis- "away, from" (see dis-) + computare "to reckon, to count" (see compute). Hence, "to abate, deduct" (1650s), and figurative sense "to leave out of account, disregard" (1702). Formerly also discompt. Commercial sense of "make a deduction from, put a reduced price upon" is by 1977. Related: Discounted; discounting.

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reckoning (n.)

early 14c., rekening, "a narration, account," verbal noun from reckon (v.). The meaning "a settling of accounts" is from mid-14c.; that of "act of counting or computing, a calculation" is from late 14c. as is the sense of "a bill of charges" (in an inn, tavern, etc.). Compare Dutch rekening "a bill, account, reckoning," Old High German rechenunga, German rechnung, Danish regning "a reckoning, computation."

The general sense is "a summing up," whether in words or numbers. In nautical use from 1660s: "Calculation of the position of a ship from the rate as determined by the log and the course as determined by the compass." Day of reckoning is attested from c. 1600; the notion is of rendering an account of one's life and conduct to God at death or judgment.

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curriculum vitae (n.)

"brief account of one's life and work," 1902, Latin, literally "course of one's life" (see curriculum + vital). Abbreviated c.v.

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parrot-fish (n.)

name given to various species on account of colors or a strong, hard mouth, 1712, from parrot (n.) + fish (n.).

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summary (n.)

"a summary statement or account," c. 1500, from Latin summarium "an epitome, abstract, summary," from summa "totality, gist" (see sum (n.)).

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esteem (n.)

(also steem, extyme), mid-14c., "account, value, worth," from French estime, from estimer (see esteem (v.)). Meaning "high regard" is from 1610s.

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report (n.)

late 14c., "an account brought by one person to another; rumor, gossip," from Old French report "pronouncement, judgment" (Modern French rapport), from reporter "to tell, relate" (see report (v.)).

By early 15c. as "informative statement by a reputable source, authoritative account." In law, "formal account of a case argued and determined in court," by 1610s. The meaning "formal statement of results of an investigation" is attested by 1660s; sense of "teacher's official statement of a pupil's work and behavior" is from 1873 (report card in the school sense is attested by 1913, American English). The meaning "resounding noise, sound of an explosion or of the discharge of a firearm" is from 1580s.  

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post (v.2)

in bookkeeping, "to transfer from a day book to a formal account, make entries in a ledger," 1620s, from post (n.2) via a figurative sense of "carrying" by post horses. Related: Posted; posting.

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noctuary (n.)

"account of what passes in the night," the converse of a diary, 1714; as though from Latin *noctuarius; see noct- "night." A word in use 18c.-19c.

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imputation (n.)

1540s, noun of action from impute (v.) on model of French imputation, or else from Late Latin imputationem (nominative imputatio) "a charge, an account," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin imputare "to charge, ascribe."

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