Etymology
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biotaxy (n.)
"classification and arrangement of living organisms according to their characteristics," 1853, from bio- "life" + -taxy, from Greek taxis "arrangement" (see tactics).
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illogical (adj.)
"without sound reasoning according to rules of logic," 1580s, from assimilated form of in- (1) "not, opposite of" + logical. Related: Illogically.
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punk (n.1)

"Chinese incense," 1870, according to OED from punk (n.) "rotten wood used as tinder;" for which see punk (adj.).

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optional (adj.)

"depending on preference," hence "that may be done or not done according to one's choice," 1765, from option + -al (1).

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canon (n.2)
"clergyman living according to rules," c. 1200 (late 12c. as a surname), from Anglo-French canun, from Old North French canonie (Modern French chanoine), from Church Latin canonicus "clergyman living under a rule," noun use of Latin adjective canonicus "according to rule" (in ecclesiastical use, "pertaining to the rules or institutes of the church canonical"), from Greek kanonikos, from kanon "rule" (see canon (n.1)).
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Tophet 
place near Jerusalem, where, according to the Old Testament, idolatrous Jews made human sacrifice to strange gods; later symbolic of the torments of Hell.
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pud (n.2)

"hand, paw, fist," 1650s, "a nursery word," according to OED. It has been compared to Dutch poot "paw;" see paw (n.).

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deutero- 

before vowels deuter-, word-forming element meaning "second," from Late Latin deutero-, from Greek deuteros "next, second," a word of uncertain origin. According to some sources from duo "two" (from PIE root *dwo- "two"), but according to Watkins the ground sense is "missing" and the Greek word is from PIE *deu-tero-, suffixed form of *deu- (1) "to lack, be wanting." But Beekes doubts even this. 

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customary (adj.)

1520s, "liable to customs or dues;" c. 1600, "according to established usage, habitual," from Medieval Latin custumarius, from Latin consuetudinarius, from consuetitudinem (see custom (n.)). In Middle English it was a noun, "written collection of customs" of a manor or community. Earlier words for "according to established usage" were custumal (c. 1400, from Old French), custumable (c. 1300). Related: Customarily.

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de jure 

Latin, literally "of law," thus "legitimate, lawful, by right of law, according to law." Jure is ablative of ius "law" (see de +  just (adj.)).

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