Etymology
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anuria (n.)
"absence of urination," 1838, medical Latin, from Greek an- "not, without" (see an- (1)) + ouron "urine" (see urine) + abstract noun ending -ia.
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non-resistance (n.)

also nonresistance, "absence of resistance; passive obedience; submission to authority, even if unjustly exercised," 1640s, from non- + resistance. Related: Non-resistant; non-resisting.

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distrust (n.)

"absence of trust; doubt or suspicion," 1510s, from dis- + trust (n.). "The etymologically correct form is mistrust, in which both elements are Teutonic" [Klein].

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anomie (n.)
"absence of accepted social values," 1915, in reference to Durkheim, who gave the word its modern meaning in social theory in French; a reborrowing with French spelling of anomy.
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charge d'affaires (n.)

"one who transacts diplomatic business with a foreign government during the absence of a superior," 1767, from French chargé d'affaires, literally "(one) charged with affairs;" see charge (v.) + affair (n.).

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dark (n.)
Origin and meaning of dark

early 13c., derk, "absence of light, night-time," from dark (adj.). Figurative in the dark "in a state of ignorance" is from 1670s; earlier it meant "in secrecy, in concealment" (late 14c.).

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congee (n.)

mid-14c., "leave or permission to depart," from Old French conget, congié "permission, leave of absence, dismissal, ceremonial leave-taking" (Modern French congé), from Medieval Latin commeatus "leave, permission to depart," in classical Latin "passage, going to and fro," hence "leave of absence," from commeare, from com "with, together" (see com-) + meare "to go, pass" (from PIE root *mei- (1) "to change, go, move"). Probably lost 17c. and revived 19c. from Modern French as  congé. Also as a verb.

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polish (n.)

1590s, originally figurative, "absence of coarseness, elegance or style of manners," from polish (v.). From 1704 as "smoothness of surface;" 1705 as "act of polishing;" 1819 as "substance used in polishing."

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unbelief (n.)
mid-12c., "absence or lack of religious belief; disbelief of the truth of the Gospel," from un- (1) "not" or un- (2) "opposite of" + belief. Old English had ungeleafa in this sense.
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absent-minded (adj.)
also absentminded, "so preoccupied as to be forgetful of one's immediate surroundings," 1810, from absent (adj.) + -minded. Absence of mind "habitual or temporary forgetfulness" is from 1782. Related: Absent-mindedly; absent-mindedness.
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