Etymology
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supernatural (n.)
1729, "a supernatural being," from supernatural (adj.). From 1830 as "that which is above or beyond the established course of nature."
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upper (n.)
"part of a shoe above the sole," 1789, from upper (adj.). Sense of "stimulant drug" is from 1968, agent noun from up (v.).
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transcendent (adj.)
mid-15c., from Latin transcendentem (nominative transcendens) "surmounting, rising above," present participle of transcendere (see transcend). Related: Transcendently.
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soubrette (n.)
1753, theatrical jargon word for lady's maid characters in plays and operas, who typically were pert, flirtatious, and intriguing, from French soubrette, from Provençal soubreto "affected, conceited," fem. of soubret "coy, reserved," from soubra "to set aside," originally "to exceed," from Old Provençal sobrar, from Latin superare "to rise above, overcome," from super "over, above, beyond" (from PIE root *uper "over").
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pre-eminent (adj.)

also preeminent, early 15c., "superior, distinguished beyond others, eminent above others," from Old French preeminent and directly from Medieval Latin preeminentem, from Latin praeeminentem (nominative praeeminens), present participle of praeeminare "to transcend, excel," literally "to project forward, rise above" (see pre-eminence). Related: Pre-eminently; preeminently.

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overhand (adv.)

1570s, "upside down," from over- + hand. Sense in tennis, etc., "with the hand above that which is gripped," is by 1861. As an adjective, of throws, strokes, or bowls, "done with the hand raised above the shoulder," it is recorded by 1828 (in cricket), originally over-handed. Middle English had over-honde as a noun, "mastery, victory" (compare upper hand).

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undistinguished (adj.)
1590s, "not kept distinct," from un- (1) "not" + distinguished. Meaning "not elevated above others" is attested from c. 1600.
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suzerain (n.)

"sovereign, ruler," 1807, from French suzerain (14c., Old French suserain), noun use of adjective meaning "sovereign but not supreme," from adverb sus "up, above," on analogy of soverain (see sovereign (adj.)). Old French sus is from Vulgar Latin *susum, from Latin sursum "upward, above," contraction of subversum, from subvertere (see subvert).

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commercialization (n.)

"operation of making (something) a matter of profit above other considerations," 1885, from commercialize + noun ending -ation.

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mesosphere (n.)

"region of the earth's atmosphere above the stratosphere and below the thermosphere," 1950, from meso- "middle" + second element in atmosphere.

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