Etymology
Advertisement
circumambulate (v.)

"to walk round or about," 1650s, from Latin circumambulatus, past participle of circumambulare "to walk around," from circum "around" (see circum-) + ambulare "to walk, go about" (see amble (v.)). Related: Circumambulated; circumambulating; circumambulation.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
ambulation (n.)

"act of walking about," 1570s, from Latin ambulationem (nominative ambulatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of ambulare "to walk, go about" (see amble (v.)). The word was used earlier in reference to the spread of disease (1540s).

Related entries & more 
fike (v.)
Middle English fyken "move about restlessly" (early 13c.), from Old Norse fikjask "to desire eagerly," fika (in fika sig upp "climb up nimbly," of a spider), probably from a general North Sea Germanic word related to the source of German ficken "to move about briskly." Later as "give trouble, vex" (1570s), a sense surviving especially in Scottish. Hence also fikery "vexatious trouble" (1823); fiky "causing trouble about trifles" (1768).
Related entries & more 
circadian (adj.)

coined 1959 by German-born biologist Franz Halberg, from Latin circa "about" (alternative form of circum "round about;" see circum-) + diem, accusative singular of dies "day" (from PIE root *dyeu- "to shine"). The original use is in circadian rhythm.

Related entries & more 
amylase (n.)
enzyme which brings about the hydrolysis of starch, 1885, from amyl + chemical suffix -ase.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
bestrew (v.)
Old English bestreowian "besprinkle, scatter about;" see be- + strew (v.).
Related entries & more 
tour (v.)
1746, "make a tour, travel about," from tour (n.). Related: Toured; touring.
Related entries & more 
lubber (v.)
"to sail clumsily; to loaf about," 1520s, from lubber (n.). Related: Lubbered; lubbering.
Related entries & more 
popster (n.)

"pop-culture enthusiast," 1963 (in a book about the Beatles), from pop (adj.)+ -ster.

Related entries & more 
bush (v.)
c. 1500, "grow thick," from bush (n.). From 1640s as "set bushes about."
Related entries & more 

Page 3