Etymology
Advertisement
knockabout (adj.)
also knock-about, "suitable for anything," 1876, from verbal phrase knock about (intrans.) "wander here and there" (1833; knock around in the same sense is from 1848); see knock (v.) + around (adv.).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
circumambulate (v.)

"to walk round or about," 1650s, from Latin circumambulatus, past participle of circumambulare "to walk around," from circum "around" (see circum-) + ambulare "to walk, go about" (see amble (v.)). Related: Circumambulated; circumambulating; circumambulation.

Related entries & more 
peri- 

word-forming element in words of Greek origin or formation meaning "around, about, enclosing," from Greek peri (prep.) "around, about, beyond," cognate with Sanskrit pari "around, about, through," Latin per, from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "in front of, before, first, chief, toward, near, around, against." Equivalent in sense to Latin circum-.

Related entries & more 
ambulation (n.)

"act of walking about," 1570s, from Latin ambulationem (nominative ambulatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of ambulare "to walk, go about" (see amble (v.)). The word was used earlier in reference to the spread of disease (1540s).

Related entries & more 
circadian (adj.)

coined 1959 by German-born biologist Franz Halberg, from Latin circa "about" (alternative form of circum "round about;" see circum-) + diem, accusative singular of dies "day" (from PIE root *dyeu- "to shine"). The original use is in circadian rhythm.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
fike (v.)
Middle English fyken "move about restlessly" (early 13c.), from Old Norse fikjask "to desire eagerly," fika (in fika sig upp "climb up nimbly," of a spider), probably from a general North Sea Germanic word related to the source of German ficken "to move about briskly." Later as "give trouble, vex" (1570s), a sense surviving especially in Scottish. Hence also fikery "vexatious trouble" (1823); fiky "causing trouble about trifles" (1768).
Related entries & more 
amylase (n.)
enzyme which brings about the hydrolysis of starch, 1885, from amyl + chemical suffix -ase.
Related entries & more 
bestrew (v.)
Old English bestreowian "besprinkle, scatter about;" see be- + strew (v.).
Related entries & more 
tour (v.)
1746, "make a tour, travel about," from tour (n.). Related: Toured; touring.
Related entries & more 
lubber (v.)
"to sail clumsily; to loaf about," 1520s, from lubber (n.). Related: Lubbered; lubbering.
Related entries & more 

Page 3