Etymology
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cronyism (n.)

1840, "friendship," from crony + -ism. Meaning "appointment of friends to important positions, regardless of ability" is originally American English, by 1952.

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numeracy (n.)

"ability with or knowledge of numbers," 1957, on model of literacy, etc., from Latin numerus "a number" (see number (n.)).

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might (n.)

"quality of being able, ability to do or act, power," Middle English might, from Old English miht, earlier mæht "bodily strength, power; authority, dominion, control; ability," from Proto-Germanic *makhti- (source also of Old Norse mattr, Old Frisian, Middle Dutch, Dutch macht, Old High German maht, German Macht, Gothic mahts), a Germanic suffixed form of the PIE root *magh- "to be able, have power."

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capability (n.)
"quality of being capable, ability to receive or power to do," 1580s, from capable + -ity. Capabilities "undeveloped faculty or property" is attested from 1778.
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unable (adj.)
late 14c., "lacking in ability, incapable," from un- (1) "not" + able (adj.). Modeled on Old French inhabile or Latin inhabilis.
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skill (n.)
late 12c., "power of discernment," from Old Norse skil "distinction, ability to make out, discernment, adjustment," related to skilja (v.) "to separate; discern, understand," from Proto-Germanic *skaljo- "divide, separate" (source also of Swedish skäl "reason," Danish skjel "a separation, boundary, limit," Middle Low German schillen "to differ," Middle Low German, Middle Dutch schele "separation, discrimination;" from PIE root *skel- (1) "to cut." Sense of "ability, cleverness" first recorded early 13c.
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Noh 

traditional Japanese masked drama, 1871, from Japanese, literally "ability, talent, accomplishment, function." A dramatic form also known as nogaku, with gaku "music."

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masterly (adj.)

1530s, "overbearing," a sense now obsolete; 1660s, "skillful, skillfully done or performed, with the skill or ability of a master," from master (n.) + -ly. For sense differentiation, see masterful.

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Ulysses 
Latin name for Odysseus, from Latin Ulysses, Ulixes. Famous for wandering as well as craftiness and ability at deceit. For -d- to -l- alteration, see lachrymose.
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judicative (adj.)
"having the ability to judge or form opinions," 1640s, from Latin iudicat-, past participle stem of iudicare "to judge," which is related to iudicem "a judge" (see judge (n.)) + -ive.
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