Etymology
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estimate (v.)
1530s, "appraise the worth of," from Latin aestimatus, past participle of aestimare "to value, appraise" (see esteem (v.)). Meaning "form an approximate notion" is from 1660s. Related: Estimated; estimates; estimating.
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overvalue (v.)

also over-value, "to value (something) above its true worth," 1590s, from over- + value (v.). Related: Overvalued; overvaluing.

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sights (n.)

"features of a place that are deemed worth seeing," 1630s, plural of sight (n.).

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shucks (interj.)
expression of indifference, 1847, from shuck (n.) in the secondary sense "something valueless" (i.e. not worth shucks, attested in a separate source from 1847).
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esteem (n.)
(also steem, extyme), mid-14c., "account, value, worth," from French estime, from estimer (see esteem (v.)). Meaning "high regard" is from 1610s.
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appraiser (n.)
"one who estimates worth" of any kind, early 15c., agent noun from appraise (v.).
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prize (n.1)

"that which is obtained or offered as the reward of exertion or contest; reward or symbol of victory," spelling alteration of Middle English prise (c. 1300 in this sense), from Old French pris "price, value, worth; reward" (see price (n.)). Figuratively, "anything worth striving for," from c. 1600. As an adjective, "worthy of a prize," from 1803. The spelling with -z- is from late 16c. Prize-fighter is from 1703; prize-fight (one for a prize) from 1730.

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sou (n.)
small French coin, 1550s, back-formation from sous, plural of Old French soul, formerly a coin worth one-twentieth of a livre, from Latin solidus (see solidus).
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millionaire (n.)

"a person worth a million dollars, pounds, francs, etc.," 1821, from French millionnaire (1762); see million. The first in America is said to have been John Jacob Astor (1763-1848).

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inconsequential (adj.)
1620s, "characterized by inconsequence;" 1782, "not worth noticing;" see inconsequent + -al (1). Related: Inconsequentially.
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