Etymology
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ceromancy (n.)

"divination by means of melted wax dripped in water" (the shapes supposedly previsioning a future spouse, etc.), 1650s, from French ceromancie, Medieval Latin ceromantia; see cero-  "wax" + -mancy "divination by means of."

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crystallomancy (n.)

"divination by means of crystals," 1610s; see crystal + -mancy.

The operator first muttered over the crystal (a beryl was preferred) certain formulas of prayer, and then gave it into the hands of a young man or a virgin, who thereupon, by oral communication from spirits in the crystal, or by written characters seen in it, was supposed to receive the information desired. [Century Dictionary]
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chiromancy (n.)

"divination by the hand, palmistry," 1520s, from French chiromancie (14c.), from Medieval Latin chiromantia, from Late Greek kheiromanteia, from kheir "hand" (from PIE root *ghes- "the hand") + -mantia "divination" (see -mancy). Related: Chiromancer; chiromantic.

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capnomancy (n.)

"divination by smoke," c. 1600, with -mancy "divination by means of" + Latinized form of Greek kapnos "smoke," which is of uncertain origin, perhaps a non-Indo-European substrate word that also produced Lithuanian kvapas "breath, smell," kvepiu, kvėpti "to gasp, breathe," Latvian kvept "to smoke, smell," and perhaps Latin vapor.

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gyromancy (n.)
1550s, method of divination said to have been practiced by a person walking in a circle marked with characters or signs till he fell from dizziness, the inference being drawn from the place in the circle at which he fell; from Medieval Latin gyromantia, from Greek gyyros "circle" (see gyro- (n.)) + manteia "divination, oracle" (see -mancy).
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geomancy (n.)

"art of divination by means of signs derived from the earth," late 14c., from Old French géomancie, from Medieval Latin geomantia, from late Greek *geomanteia, from geo-, combining form of "earth" (see Gaia) + manteia "divination" (see -mancy). Related: Geomantic; geomantical.

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bibliomancy (n.)
1753, "divination by opening a book (especially the Bible) at random," the first verse presenting itself being taken as a prognostication of future events, from biblio- + -mancy. In pagan times, Homer (sortes Homericae) and Virgil (sortes Virgilianae) were used.
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sciomancy (n.)

"divination by communication with the shades of the dead," 1620s, from Modern Latin sciomantia, from scio-, Latinized combining form of Greek skia "shade, shadow" (see Ascians) + Latinized form of Greek manteia (see -mancy). Related: Sciomantic; sciomancer.

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rhapsodomancy (n.)

"divination by means of verses," by 1738, from French rhapsodomancie, from Greek rhapsodos "a rhapsodist" (see rhapsody) + -manteia (see -mancy). Also compare sortes under bibliomancy.

There were various methods of practicing rhapsodomancy—Sometimes they wrote several verses or sentences of a poet, on so many pieces of wood, paper, or the like; shook them together in an urn; and drew out one, which was accounted the lot. Sometimes they cast dice on a table, whereon verses were wrote; and that whereon the dye lodged, contained the prediction. [Chambers' "Cyclopædia," London, 1738]
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rhabdomancy (n.)

1640s, "dowsing, use of a divining rod" (especially to find things hidden in the earth, ores or underground water), with -mancy "divination by means of" (from Greek manteia "divination, oracle") + Greek rhabdos "rod, wand; magic wand; fishing rod; spear-shaft; a staff of office; a rod for chastisement; twig, stick." Greek rhabdos is from PIE *wer- (2), base of roots meaning "to turn, bend" (source also of Lithuanian virbas "twig, branch, scion, rod," Latin verbena "leaves and branches of laurel").

The Greek noun was used to represent Roman fasces. Related: Rhabdomantic; rhabdomancer.

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