Etymology
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macadamia (n.)

Australian evergreen tree, commercially important for its edible nut, 1904, from Modern Latin (1858), named for Scotland-born chemist Dr. John Macadam, secretary of the Victoria Philosophical Institute, Australia, + abstract noun ending -ia.

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hyperaesthesia (n.)

"exalted sensation," 1835, from Modern Latin (1783), from hyper- "over, exceedingly, to excess" + Greek aisthēsis "feeling" (from PIE root *au- "to perceive") + abstract noun ending -ia. Related: Hyperaesthetic.

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eclampsia (n.)
1866, from Modern Latin, from Greek eklampsis "a shining forth, exceeding brightness," from ek- "out" (see ex-) + stem of lampein "to shine" (see lamp) + abstract noun ending -ia.
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Aglaia 
name of one of the Graces, Greek, literally "splendor, beauty, brightness," from aglaos "splendid, beautiful, bright," which is of unknown origin (probably connected with agauos "noble, illustrious;" see agave), + abstract noun ending -ia.
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paraesthesia (n.)

also paresthesia, "abnormal sensation, hallucination of the senses," 1835, from para- (1), here meaning "disordered," + Greek aisthēsis "perception, feeling" (from PIE root *au- "to perceive") + abstract noun ending -ia.

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polydipsia (n.)

in pathology, "excessive thirst," 1650s, from Greek polydipsios "very thirsty," from polys "much, many" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill") + dipsa "thirst" (a word of unknown origin) + -ia "condition of."

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stichomythia (n.)
"dialogue in alternate lines," Latinized from Greek stikhomythia, from stikhos (see stichic) + mythos "speech, talk" (see myth) + abstract noun ending -ia. Related: Stichomythic.
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Belgravia 
fashionable residential district of London, noted for the wealthiness and aristocracy of its residents, it was developed in the 1820s and after on land owned by Earl Grosvenor and named (with -ia) for Belgrave, site of a Grosvenor estate in Cheshire.
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Manchuria 

large part of China east of Mongolia and north of Korea, named for the Manchu (literally "pure") people + -ia. Related: Manchurian. Manchurian Candidate is 1959 as a novel, 1962 as a film.

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begonia (n.)
showy flowering plant native to warm regions, 1751, from French begonia (1706), named by French botanist Charles Plumier for Michel Bégon (1638-1710), French governor of Santo Domingo (Haiti) and patron of botany, + abstract noun ending -ia.
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