Etymology
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sambuca (n.)

Italian flavored liqueur, made from elderberries, that resembles French anisette, 1971, from Italian, from Latin sambucus "elder tree."

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same (adj.)

"identical, equal; unchanging; one in substance or general character," from Proto-Germanic *samaz "same" (source also of Old Saxon, Old High German, Gothic sama, Old High German samant, German samt "together, with," Gothic samana "together," Dutch zamelen "to collect," German zusammen "together"), from PIE *samos "same," from suffixed form of root *sem- (1) "one; as one, together with."

Old English seems to have lost the adjective except in the adverbial phrase swa same "the same as" (literally "so same"). But the word that emerged in Middle English as "the ordinary adjectival pronominal designation of identity" [OED] is considered to be more likely (or mostly) from the Old Norse cognate same, samr "same." In its revival it replaced synonymous ilk.

As a pronoun, "the person or thing just mentioned," from c. 1300. In Middle English also a verb and an adjective, "together, mutually" (as in comen same "gather together, unite," kissen same "embrace one another").

Colloquial phrase same here "the same thing applies to me" as an exclamation of agreement is from 1895. All the same is from 1803 as "nevertheless, in spite of what has been mentioned." Same difference, a curious way to say "not different; equal," is attested from 1945. Often expanded for emphasis: ilk-same (mid-13c.); the self-same (early 15c.); one and the same is in Wyclif (late 14c.), translating Latin unus atque idem.

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sameness (n.)

1580s, "oneness, unity, absence or negation of otherness," from same + -ness. From 1743 (Walpole's letters) as "want of variety, monotony."

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same-sex (adj.)

by 1949, with reference to parents, "of the same sex as the child;" by 1981 as "involving partners of the same sex;" from same + sex (n.).

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Samhain (n.)

"ancient Celtic festival celebrated on the first of November," 1888, from Irish samhain (Gaelic samhuinn), from Old Irish samain, literally "summer's end," from Old Irish sam "summer" (see summer (n.1)) + fuin "end." It marked the start of winter and of the new year.

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Sami (n.)

native name for "Lapp," preferred by modern scholars, 1797, from the Lapp self-designation; it is of uncertain origin.

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Samian (adj.)

"of or pertaining to Samos," 1570s, from Latin Samius, from Samus, Samos.

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samisen (n.)

Japanese three-stringed banjo-like instrument, 1610s, from Chinese san-hsien, literally "three-strings," from san "three" + hsien "string."

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samite (n.)

c. 1300 (early 13c. in Anglo-Latin), "a type of rich silk cloth," from Old French samit, from Medieval Latin samitum, examitum, from Medieval Greek hexamiton (source of Old Church Slavonic oksamitu, Russian aksamit "velvet"), noun use of neuter of Greek adjective hexamitos "six-threaded," from hex "six" (see six) + mitos "warp thread," a word of uncertain etymology.

The reason it was called this is variously explained; the traditional explanation is that it was woven of six fibers, or in a pattern involving six. Obsolete c. 1600; revived loosely by Tennyson. German Sammet "velvet" is from French.

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samizdat (n.)

"illegal and clandestine copying and sharing of literature," 1967, from Russian samizdat, "self-publishing," from sam "self" (from PIE root *sem- (1) "one; as one, together with") + izdatel'stvo "publishing" (from iz "from, out of," from PIE *eghs; see ex-; + dat' "to give," from PIE root *do- "to give"). The formation is said to be a word-play on Gosizdat, the former state publishing house of the USSR. One who took part in it was a samizdatchik (plural samizdatchiki). Later and less common was tamizdat "writings published abroad and smuggled back into the USSR," from tam "there."

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