Etymology
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indigestible (adj.)
late 15c., from Late Latin indigestibilis or else a native formation from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + digestible; or else from Late Latin indigestibilis. Related: Indigestibility (1733).
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inconclusive (adj.)
1660s, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + conclusive. Related: Inconclusively. Inconclusion is "rare," perhaps because it could mean either "reaching no conclusion" or "reaching an unwarranted conclusion." Related: Inconclusiveness.
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indecision (n.)
1735, from in- (1) "not, opposite of, without" + decision. Perhaps from or modeled on French indécision (17c.), which Cotgrave's "French and English Dictionary" (1673) translates with An undecision.
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ingot (n.)
late 14c., "mold in which metal is cast," probably from in- (2) "in" + Old English goten, past participle of geotan "to pour" (from PIE root *gheu- "to pour"). Sense of "mass of cast metal" first attested early 15c.
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inoffensive (adj.)

"giving no offense, doing no harm, not causing disturbance, free from anything displeasing or disturbing," 1590s, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + offensive (adj.). Related: Inoffensively; inoffensiveness.

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indubious (adj.)
"certain, not doubtful," 1620s, from Latin indubius "not doubtful," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + dubius "vacillating, fluctuating," figuratively "wavering in opinion, doubting" (see dubious). Related: Indubiously.
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inhospitable (adj.)

1560s, from French inhospitable (15c.), from Medieval Latin inhospitabilis (equivalent of Latin inhospitalis), from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + Medieval Latin hospitabilis (see hospitable).

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incommodious (adj.)
1550s, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + commodious. Related: Incommodiously. A verb, incommode, is attested from late 16c., from Latin incommodare. The Latin adjective was incommodus "inconvenient."
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inconsolable (adj.)
1590s, from Latin inconsolabilis "inconsolable," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + consolabilis "consolable," from consolari (see console (v.)). Related: Inconsolably (c. 1500).
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invigorate (v.)
1640s, from in- (2) + vigor (n.) + -ate (2). Earlier verb was envigor (1610s), from Old French envigorer. Related: Invigorated; invigorating.
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