Etymology
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pampas (n.)

"vast treeless plains of South America," 1704, from Argentine Spanish pampas, plural of pampa, from Quechua (Inca) pampa "a plain." Related: Pampean. Similar landscapes north of the Amazon are called llanos (see llano).

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pamper (v.)

late 14c., pamperen, "to cram with food, indulge with food," probably from a Low German source such as Middle Dutch (compare West Flemish pamperen "cram with food, overindulge;" dialectal German pampen "to cram"), probably from a frequentative of the root of pap (n.1). Meaning "treat luxuriously, overindulge" (transitive) is attested by 1520s. Related: Pampered; pampering.

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pampered (adj.)

1520s, "over-fed," past-participle adjective from pamper. Meaning "spoiled by luxury" is from 1690s. Related: Pamperedness.

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pamphlet (n.)

"small, unbound treatise," late 14c., pamflet, "brief written text; poem, tract, small book," from Anglo-Latin panfletus, which probably is a popular short form of "Pamphilus, seu de Amore" ("Pamphilus, or about Love"), a short 12c. Latin love poem popular and widely copied in the Middle Ages; the name from Greek pamphilos "loved by all," from pan- "all" (pam- before labials; see pan-) + philos "loving, dear" see -phile).

Meaning "brief work dealing with questions of current interest; short treatise or essay, generally controversial, on some subject of temporary public interest" is from late 16c.

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pamphleteer 

1640s as a noun, "a writer of pamphlets," from pamphlet + -eer. As a verb, "to write and issue pamphlets," from 1690s. Related: Pamphleteering.

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Pamphylia 
ancient region in modern Turkey, from Greek, literally "place of all races," from pan "all" (see pan-) + phylon "race" (see phylo-).
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Pamplona 

city in Spain, Roman Pompeiopolis, named for Pompey the Great, Roman military leader who founded it 68 B.C.E.

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pan (v.2)
"follow with a camera," 1913 shortening of panoramic in panoramic camera (1878). Meaning "to swing from one object to another in a scene" is from 1931. Related: Panned; panning.
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Pan 

Greek god of shepherds and flocks, woods and fields, with upper body of a man and horns and lower part like a goat, late 14c., from Latin, from Greek Pan. Klein and others suggest the Greek word is cognate with Sanskrit pusan, a Vedic god, guardian and multiplier of cattle and other human possessions, literally "nourisher," from a PIE root *peh- "to protect," but others doubt this.

His worship originated in Arcadia and gradually spread throughout Greece. The similarity to pan "all" (see pan-) led to his being regarded as a general personification of nature. He was fond of music and dancing with the forest nymphs; the pan-pipe, which he invented and upon which he played, is attested by that name in English from 1820.

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pan (n.)

"broad, shallow vessel of metal used for domestic purposes," Middle English panne, from Old English panne, earlier ponne (Mercian) "pan," from Proto-Germanic *panno "pan" (source also of Old Norse panna, Old Frisian panne, Middle Dutch panne, Dutch pan, Old Low German panna, Old High German phanna, German pfanne), probably an early borrowing (4c. or 5c.) from Vulgar Latin *patna. This is supposed to be from Latin patina "shallow pan, dish, stew-pan," from Greek patane "plate, dish," from PIE *pet-ano-, from root *pete- "to spread."

But both the Latin and Germanic words might be from a substrate language [Boutkan]. Irish panna probably is from English, and Lithuanian panė is from German.

The word has been used of any hollow thing shaped somewhat like a pan; the sense of "head, top of the head" is by c. 1300. It was used of pan-shaped parts of mechanical apparatus from c. 1590; hence flash in the pan (see flash (n.1)), a figurative use from early firearms, where a pan held the priming (and the gunpowder might "flash," but no shot ensue). To go out of the (frying) pan into the fire "escape one evil only to fall into a worse" is in Spenser (1596).

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