Etymology
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cow-catcher (n.)

"strong frame in front of a locomotive for removing obstructions such as stray cattle," 1838, from cow (n.) + catcher.

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incredulity (n.)

"disbelieving frame of mind," early 15c., incredulite, from Old French incrédulité, from Latin incredulitatem (nominative incredulitas) "unbelief," noun of quality from incredulus "unbelieving" (see incredulous).

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casement (n.)
type of hinged sash-window that swings open like doors, early 15c., originally "hollow molding, frame for glass," probably a shortening of Old French dialectal enchassement "window frame" (Modern French enchâssement), from en- "in," prefix forming verbs, + casse "case, frame" (see case (n.2)) + -ment. Or possibly from Anglo-Latin cassementum, from casse. The "window" sense is from 1550s in English. Old folk etymology tended to make it gazement.

The Irish surname is originally Mc Casmonde (attested from 1429), from a misdivision of Mac Asmundr, from Irish mac "son of" + Old Norse Asmundr "god protector."
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leading (n.1)
"lead work; lead covering or frame of lead," mid-15c., verbal noun from lead (n.1). Printing sense is from 1855.
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carpetbag (n.)
also carpet-bag, "soft-cover traveling case made of carpet fabric on a frame," 1830, from carpet (n.) + bag (n.). As a verb, 1872, from the noun.
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scaffolding (n.)

"frame or structure for temporary support in construction, etc.," mid-14c.; see scaffold. Scaffoldage is from c. 1600.

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bedpost (n.)
also bed-post, "post forming an angle of a bed frame," 1590s, from bed (n.) + post (n.1). Formerly they were made high to support a canopy and rods for a curtain.
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horn-book (n.)
also hornbook, 1580s, teaching tool consisting of a page with the alphabet, numerals, etc. written on it, fixed to a frame, and covered with transparent horn;" from horn (n.) + book (n.).
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hypertext (n.)

1969, from hyper- "over, above" + text (n.).

In place of the verbal connectives that are used in normal text, such as topic or transition sentences, hypertext connects nodes ... through links. The primary purpose of a link is to connect one card, node or frame and another card, frame or node that enables the user to jump from one to another. [David H. Jonassen, "Hypertext/hypermedia," 1989]
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buck (n.3)
"sawhorse, frame composed of two X-shaped ends joined at the middle by a bar," 1817, American English, apparently from Dutch bok "trestle," literally "buck" (see buck (n.1)). Compare easel.
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