Etymology
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interbreed (v.)
1803 (transitive) "to breed by crossing species or varieties," from inter- + breed (v.). Intransitive sense of "procreate with one of a different species" is from 1825. Related: Interbred; interbreeding.
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right of way (n.)

1767, "legal right, established by usage, to pass across grounds or property belonging to another." Of the path itself from 1805. By 1913 as "legal right of a pedestrian or vehicle to have precedence at a crossing or convergence." 

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passage (n.)

early 13c., "a road, a pathway;" c. 1300, "action of crossing from one place to another; a going over or through something; means of crossing," from Old French passage "mountain pass, passage" (11c.), from passer "to go by," from Vulgar Latin *passare "to step, walk, pass," from Latin passus "step, pace" (from PIE root *pete- "to spread"). Meaning "corridor in a building" is recorded from 1610s. Meaning "a portion of writing," originally one concerning a particular occurrence or matter, is from 1610s; of music, from 1670s.

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quagga (n.)

zebra-like South African animal, partly striped, 1785, from Afrikaans (1710), from the name for the beast in a native language, perhaps Khoisan (Hottentot) quacha, which often is said somehow to be of imitative origin. According to OED, in modern Xhosa, the form is iqwara, with a clicking -q-. What was likely the last one died in an Amsterdam zoo in 1883.

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chiasma (n.)

in anatomy, "a crossing, an intersection," 1832, medical Latin, from Greek khiasma "two things placed crosswise," which is related to khiasmos (see chi, and compare chiasmus). In cytology from 1911. Related: Chiasmal.

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cross-stitch (n.)

1710, in needlework, "a stitch in the form of an X; two stitches, one crossing the other in the middle," from cross- + stitch (n.). As a verb from 1794. Related: Cross-stitched; crossed-stitching.

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traverse (n.)
"act of passing through a gate, crossing a bridge, etc.," mid-14c., from Old French travers, from traverser (see traverse (v.)). Meaning "a passage by which one may traverse" is recorded from 1670s. Military fortification sense of "barrier, barricade" is recorded from 1590s.
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crossed (adj.)

 "made in the shape of a cross, marked by a line drawn across," past-participle adjective from cross (v.). Figurative sense of "thwarted" is from 1620s. To be crossed out "cancelled by crossing lines" is by 1780. Crossed wires as figurative of confusion, miscommunication is by 1910. 

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Jordan 
river in ancient Palestine; the crossing of it is symbolic of death in high-flown language as a reference to Numbers xxxiii.51. Also a type of pot or vessel (late 14c.), especially a chamber-pot, but the sense there is unknown. The modern nation-state dates to 1921. Related: Jordanian.
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fjord (n.)

1670s, from Norwegian fiord, from Old Norse fjörðr "an inlet, estuary," from North Germanic *ferthuz "place for crossing over, ford," from PIE *pertu-, from root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over." The etymological sense probably is "a going, a passage."

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