Etymology
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Crip (n.)
member of a major U.S. street gang, founded in South Central Los Angeles 1971, the name supposedly originally was cribs, partly a reference to the youth of most of the original members, and when they began carrying "pimp canes" it was altered to Crip, which has been attested in U.S. slang as a shortening of cripple (n.) since 1918.
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Juventus 
Roman god of youth, personification of iuventas "youth, young person," originally "the age of youth" (from 20 to 40), from iuvenis "young man" (see young (adj.)).
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gangster (n.)
"member of a criminal gang," 1896, American English, from gang (n.) in its criminal sense + -ster. Related: Gangsterism (1918).
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Hebe (1)

c. 1600, Greek goddess of youth, daughter of Zeus and Hera, wife of Hercules, from Greek hēbē "youth, youthful prime, strength of youth" (legally, "the time before manhood," in Athens 16, in Sparta 18), from PIE *yeg-wa- "power, youth, strength."

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juvenilia (n.)
"works of a person's youth," 1620s, from Latin iuvenilia, neuter plural of iuvenilis "of or belonging to youth" (see juvenile).
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Komsomol (n.)
Russian communist youth organization, 1925, from Russian Komsomol, contraction of Kommunisticheskii Soyuz Molodezhi "Communist Union of Youth."
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juvenility (n.)
1620s, "state of being young or youthful," from Latin iuvenilitas "youth," abstract noun from iuvenilis "of youth," from iuvenis "young man" (see young (adj.)). Meaning "anything characteristic of youth" is from 1660s; that of "juveniles collectively" is from 1823.
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Jugendstil (n.)
German equivalent of art nouveau, from "Jugend" ("Youth"), the name of a German magazine begun in 1896 + stil "style." See youth (n.) + style (n.).
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gangland (n.)
"the criminal underworld; the realm of gangsters," 1912, from gang (n.) + land (n.).
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plug-ugly (n.)

"city ruffian, one of a gang who assaulted people and property in mid-19th century American cities," 1856, originally in Baltimore, from plug (n.), the American English slang name for the tall, silk stovepipe hats then popular among young men, + ugly. Sometimes as the name of a specific gang, but often generic.

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