Etymology
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Xenia 
city in Ohio, from Greek xenia "hospitality, rights of a guest, friendly relation with strangers," literally "state of a guest," from xenos "guest" (from PIE root *ghos-ti- "stranger, guest, host"). Founded 1803 and named by vote of a town meeting, on suggestion of the Rev. Robert Armstrong to imply friendliness and hospitality.
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xenial (adj.)
"pertaining to hospitality," 1834, from Greek xenia (see Xenia) + -al (1). Related: Xenially.
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xeno- 
before vowels, xen-, word-forming element meaning "strange, foreign; stranger, foreigner," from Greek xenos "a guest, stranger, foreigner, refugee, guest-friend, one entitled to hospitality," cognate with Latin hostis, from PIE root *ghos-ti- "stranger, guest, host." "The term was politely used of any one whose name was unknown" [Liddell & Scott].
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xenogamy (n.)
"fertilization by pollen from a different plant," 1877, from xeno- "strange, foreign" + -gamy "fertilization." Related: Xenogamous.
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xenolith (n.)
1894, from xeno- "foreign, strange" + -lith "stone."
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xenon (n.)
gaseous element, 1898, from Greek xenon, neuter of xenos "foreign, strange" (from PIE root *ghos-ti- "stranger, guest, host"); coined by its co-discoverer, Scottish chemist Sir William Ramsay (1852-1916); compare krypton.
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xenophile (n.)

1922, from xeno- "foreign, strange" + -phile.

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xenophobe (n.)
1897, from xeno- "foreign, strange" + -phobe. As an adjective from 1908.
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xenophobia (n.)
1903, from xeno- "foreign, strange" + -phobia "fear." Earlier (c. 1884) it meant "agoraphobia."
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