Etymology
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Hemingwayesque (adj.)

1934, in reference to American writer Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961). With -esque.

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pastoralist (n.)

"a writer of pastorals," 1793, from pastoral + -ist. Perhaps modeled on earlier German Pastoralist.

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necrographer (n.)

"a writer of obituary notices," 1808, from necro- "death" + ending as in biographer, etc.

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tragedian (n.)

"writer of tragedies," late 14c., from Old French tragediane (Modern French tragédien), from tragedie (see tragedy). Another word for this was tragician (mid-15c.). Meaning "actor in tragedies" is from 1590s. French-based fem. form tragedienne is from 1851. In late classical Greek, tragodos was the actor, tragodopoios the writer.

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essayist (n.)

"writer of essays," c. 1600, from essay (n.) + -ist. French essayiste (19c.) is from English.

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wegotism (n.)

1797, from we + egotism; "an obtrusive and too frequent use of the first person plural by a speaker or writer" [OED].

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pamphleteer 

1640s as a noun, "a writer of pamphlets," from pamphlet + -eer. As a verb, "to write and issue pamphlets," from 1690s. Related: Pamphleteering.

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scribe (n.)

late 12c., "professional interpreter of the Jewish Law" (late 11c. as a surname), from Church Latin scriba "teacher of Jewish law," used in Vulgate to render Greek grammateus (corresponding to Hebrew sopher "writer, scholar"). It is a special use of Latin scriba "keeper of accounts, secretary, writer," an agent noun from the past-participle stem of scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut").

The sense "one who writes, official or public writer" in English is from late 14c. That of "copyist, transcriber of manuscripts" is from 1530s. Used loosely for "an author, one fond of writing" by 1580s.

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Tarzan 

name of character in a series of novels by U.S. fiction writer Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875-1950), introduced 1914.

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reminder (n.)

"something which reminds, one who or that which reminds," 1650s, agent noun from remind. A 17c. writer has remindless "forgetful."

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