Etymology
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unwound (adj.)
"no longer wound," 1707, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of wind (v.1).
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sore (n.)
Old English sar "bodily pain or injury, wound; sickness, disease; state of pain or suffering," from root of sore (adj.). Now restricted to ulcers, boils, blisters. Compare Old Saxon ser "pain, wound," Middle Dutch seer, Dutch zeer, Old High German ser, Old Norse sar, Gothic sair.
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bane (n.)

Old English bana "killer, slayer, murderer, a worker of death" (human, animal, or object), also "the devil," from Proto-Germanic *banon, cognate with *banja- "wound" (source also of Old Frisian bona "murderer," Old Norse bani "death; that which causes death," Old High German bana "death, destruction," Old English benn "wound," Gothic banja "stroke, wound"), a word of no certain IE etymology. Sense of "that which causes ruin or woe" is from 1570s. Related: Baneful.

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bandage (v.)
"to dress a wound, etc., with a bandage," 1734 (implied in bandaging), from bandage (n.). Related: Bandaged.
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scar (n.1)

[mark on skin resulting from a wound or hurt] late 14c., scarre, "trace left on skin by a healed wound, burn, etc.," from Old French escare "scab" (Modern French escarre), from Late Latin eschara, from Greek eskhara, in medical writing "scab formed after a burn," which is of uncertain origin.

The English sense probably shows influence of another noun scar "crack, cut, incision" (Middle English scarre, skar; attested from late 14c. into 17c.), which is from Old Norse skarð and related to score (n.). Figurative sense attested from 1580s. Old English glossed Latin cicatrix with dolhswað, from dolh "wound" + swað "track, trace."

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hurt (n.)
c. 1200, "a wound, an injury;" also "sorrow, lovesickness," from hurt (v.). Old French had hurte (n.), but the sense "injury" is only in English.
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stab (n.)
"wound produced by stabbing," mid-15c., from stab (v.). Meaning "act of stabbing" is from 1520s. Meaning "a try" first recorded 1895, American English. Stab in the back in the figurative sense "treacherous deed" is first attested 1881; the verbal phrase in the figurative sense is from 1888.
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plunk (v.)

1805, "to pluck a stringed instrument;" 1808 in sense of "drop down abruptly;" 1888 as "to hit, wound, shoot." Probably of independent imitative origin in each case. Related: Plunked; plunking.

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debridement (n.)

"removal of damaged tissue from a wound," 1839, from French débridement, literally "an unbridling," from débrider "to unbridle," from dé- (see de-) + bride "bridle," from a Germanic source akin to Middle High German bridel (see bridle (n.)). Related: debride, debriding.

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disembowel (v.)

"eviscerate, wound so as to permit the bowels to protrude," c. 1600, from dis- + embowel. Earlier form was disbowel (mid-15c.); embowel, with the same meaning, is attested from 1520s. Related: Disemboweled; disembowelment.

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