Etymology
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flock (n.2)
"tuft of wool," mid-13c., also found in continental Germanic and Scandinavian, all probably from Old French floc, from Latin floccus "tuft of wool, lock of hair," a word of unknown origin.
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flocculent (adj.)
"resembling wool, fleecy," 1800, from Latin floccus "lock of hair, tuft of wool," a word of unknown origin, + -ulent. Related: Flocculence.
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cashmere (n.)
also Cassimere, etc., "type of fine, soft woolen fabric," favored for shawls, etc., 1839, short for Cashmere wool, from the old spellings of Kashmir, the Himalayan kingdom where wool was obtained from long-haired goats. As "shawl made of cashmere wool" from 1822.
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carding (n.)
"wool-dressing," late 15c., verbal noun from card (v.2).
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pashmina (adj.)

1885, from Persian pashmin "woolen," from pashm "wool, down," from PIE *pek- "to pluck out" (see fight (v.)).

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Sufi (n.)
member of a Muslim mystical order, 1650s (earlier Sufian, 1580s), from Arabic sufi, literally "man of wool" (i.e., "man wearing woolen garments," as opposed to silk), from suf "wool." According to Klein, so-called from the habit of "putting on the holy garment" (labs-as-suf) to devote oneself to mysticism. Related: Sufic.
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willies (n.)
"spell of nervousness," 1896, perhaps from the woollies, a dialectal term for "nervous uneasiness," probably in reference to the itchiness of wool garments.
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fleece (n.)
"wool coat of a sheep," Old English fleos, flies "fleece, wool, fur, sealskin," from West Germanic *flusaz (source also of Middle Dutch vluus, Dutch vlies, Middle High German vlius, German Vlies), which is of uncertain origin; probably from PIE *pleus- "to pluck," also "a feather, fleece" (source also of Latin pluma "feather, down," Lithuanian plunksna "feather").
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tease (v.)
formerly also teaze, Old English tæsan "pluck, pull, tear; pull apart, comb" (fibers of wool, flax, etc.), from Proto-Germanic *taisijan (source also of Danish tæse, Middle Dutch tesen, Dutch tezen "to draw, pull, scratch," Old High German zeisan "to tease, pick wool").

The original sense is of running thorns through wool or flax to separate, shred, or card the fibers. The figurative sense of "vex, worry, annoy" (sometimes done in good humor) emerged 1610s. For similar sense development, compare heckle. Hairdressing sense is recorded from 1957. Related: Teased; teasing; teasingly.
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batting (n.1)
"sheets of cotton fiber," 1875, variant of obsolete bat "felted mass of fur, wool, etc." (see bat (n.1)), on notion of "beaten" fabric.
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