Etymology
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evaginate (v.)

1650s, "withdraw (something) from a sheath;" 1660s, "to turn (a tube) inside out," from Latin evaginatus, past participle of evaginare "to unsheathe," from assimilated form of ex "out, out of" (see ex-) + vagina (see vagina). Related: Evaginated; evaginating.

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abstract (v.)
Origin and meaning of abstract

1540s, "to draw away, withdraw, remove" (transitive), from Latin abstractus or else from abstract (adj.). From 1610s in the philosophical sense "consider as a general object or idea without regard to matter." Related: Abstracted; abstracting.

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back down (v.)

in figurative sense of "withdraw a charge," 1859, American English, from the notion of descending a ladder, etc. (such a literal sense is attested by 1849); from back (v.) + down (adv.).

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separatism (n.)

"disposition to withdraw from some combination or union," 1620s, from separate + -ism. Especially in reference to a withdrawal from an established church, or to Church and State; from 1866 in a purely political sense.

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introversion (n.)

1650s, "action of turning inward" (of thought or contemplation), from Modern Latin introversionem, noun of action from past participle stem of *introvertere (see introvert (v.)). Psychological meaning "tendency to withdraw from the world" is from 1912.

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drop-out (n.)

also dropout, "one who 'drops out' of something" (a course of education, life, etc.), 1930, from the verbal phrase drop out "withdraw or disappear from place" (1550s); see drop (v.) + out (adv.). 

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disfavor (n.)

1530s "unfavorable regard, slight displeasure;" 1580s, "state of being regarded unfavorably;" see dis- "the opposite of" + favor (n.). As a verb, "withdraw or withhold favor or support," from 1560s. Related: Disfavored; disfavoring.

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absent (v.)
Origin and meaning of absent

late 14c., "withdraw (oneself), go away, stay away," from Old French absenter "absent (oneself)," from Late Latin absentare "cause to be away," from Latin absentem (see absent (adj.)). Related: Absented; absenting.

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resile (v.)

1520s, "to draw back," of persons, from obsolete French resiler "withdraw from an agreement," or directly from Latin resilire "to jump back" (see resilience). The meaning "spring back, start back, recoil" (of material things, especially elastic bodies) is from 1708. Related: Resiled; resiling.

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disengage (v.)

c. 1600 in figurative sense "loosen from that which entangles;" 1660s in literal sense of "detach, release from connection," from dis- "do the opposite of" + engage (q.v.). Intransitive sense of "withdraw, become separated" is from 1640s. Related: Disengaged; disengaging.

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