Etymology
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huntsman (n.)
1560s, from genitive of hunt (n.) + man (n.).
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enchantress (n.)
late 14c., "witch," from enchanter + -ess. Meaning "charming woman" is from 1713.
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hawk (v.2)
"to hunt with a hawk," mid-14c., from hawk (n.).
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hex (v.)

1830, American English, from Pennsylvania German hexe "to practice witchcraft," from German hexen "to hex," related to Hexe "witch," from Middle High German hecse, hexse, from Old High German hagazussa (see hag). Noun meaning "magic spell" is first recorded 1909; earlier it meant "a witch" (1856). Compare Middle English hexte "the devil" (mid-13c.), perhaps originally "sorcerer," probably from Old English haehtis.

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fowler (n.)
Old English fugelere, agent noun from fuglian "to hunt fowl" (see fowl (v.)). The German equivalent is Vogler.
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mouse (v.)

"to hunt or catch mice," mid-13c., mousen, from mouse (n.). Related: Moused; mousing.

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jager (n.)
also jaeger, "German sharpshooter," 1776, from German Jäger, literally "huntsman," from jagen "to hunt," from Old High German jagon, related to Old Frisian jagia, Dutch jagen "to hunt," Old Norse jaga "to drive, to move to and fro" (see yacht (n.)). Applied to riflemen and sharpshooters in the German and Austrian armies. Englished as yager, yaeger from 1804.
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Sidon 
ancient Phoenician city, from Greek Sidon, from Phoenician Tzidhon, literally "fishing place," from tzud "to hunt, to capture." Related: Sidonian.
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cacciatore (adj.)
in cookery, "hunter-style," by 1973, from Italian, literally "hunter," from past participle of cacciare "to hunt, chase" (see chase (v.)).
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forage (v.)

early 15c., "to plunder, pillage," from forage (n.) or from French fourrager. Meaning "hunt about for" is from 1768. Related: Foraged; foraging.

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