Etymology
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Thoth 
ancient Egyptian god of wisdom and magic, hieroglyphics, and the reckoning of time, from Latin, from Greek Thoth, from Egyptian Tehuti. Usually represented as a human figure with the head of an ibis. By the Greeks, assimilated to their Hermes.
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deepness (n.)

Old English deopnes "deep water," also "a mystery or secret;" see deep (adj.) + -ness. From late 12c. as "distance downward;" c. 1200 as "wisdom, profundity."

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lip-service (n.)
"something proffered but not performed, service with the lips only; insincere profession of good will," 1640s, from lip (n.) + service (n.1). Earlier in same sense was lip-labour (1530s). This was a general pattern in 16c.-17c., for example lip-wisdom (1580s), the wisdom of those who do not practice what they preach; lip-religion (1590s), lip-devotion "prayer without genuine faith or desire" (c. 1600); lip-comfort (1630s).
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Hakeem 
also Hakim, masculine proper name, from Arabic hakim "wise," as a noun "physician; philosopher; governor," from stem of hakuma "he was wise;" whence also hakam "judge," hikmah "wisdom, science."
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bo tree (n.)
1680s, from Sinhalese bo, from Pali bodhi, short for bodhi-taru "bo tree," literally "tree of wisdom or enlightenment" (related to Sanskrit buddhah "awakened," from PIE root *bheudh- "be aware, make aware") + taru "tree."
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expedience (n.)
mid-15c., "advantage, benefit," from Old French expedience, from Late Latin expedientia, from expedientem (see expedient). From "that which is expedient," the sense tends toward "utilitarian wisdom." Meaning "quality of being expedient" is from 1610s. Related: Expediency (1610s).
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kenspeck (adj.)
"known by marks, conspicuous, easily recognizable," 1580s, from Old Norse kennispeki "the faculty of recognition," from kenni "a mark" + speki "wisdom," from spakr "wise." Sometimes kenspeckled (1714), as though "conspicuous because marked with speckles or freckles."
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Bodhisattva (n.)
"one of a class of beings in Mahayana Buddhism who have attained supreme wisdom," 1828, from Sanskrit, literally "one whose essence is perfect knowledge," from bodhi "perfect knowledge" (see Buddha) + sattva "reality, being," from sat-, sant- "existing, true, virtuous," from PIE root *es- "to be."
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purveyance (n.)

c. 1300, purveiaunce, "foresight, foreknowledge, prudence, wisdom" (senses now obsolete), from Anglo-French purveance and directly from Old French porveance, pourveance, from Latin providentia (see providence). From early 14c. as "that which is needed or provided," late 14c. as "act of providing or procuring what is necessary, preliminary arrangement."

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-dom 

abstract suffix of state, from Old English dom "statute, judgment" (see doom (n.)). Originally an independent word, but already active as a suffix in Old English (as in freodom, wisdom). Cognate with German -tum (Old High German tuom). "Jurisdiction," hence "province, state, condition, quality."

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