Etymology
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strath (n.)
"wide river valley between hills," 1530s, from Scottish, from Old Irish srath "wide river valley," from Old Celtic *s(t)rato-, from PIE root *stere- "to spread."
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Vistavision (n.)
form of wide-screen cinematography, 1954; see vista + vision.
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yawn (v.)

c. 1300, yenen, yonen, from Old English ginian, gionian "open the mouth wide, yawn, gape," from Proto-Germanic *gin- (source also of Old English giwian, giowian, giwan "to request," Old Norse gina "to yawn," Dutch geeuwen, Old High German ginen"to be wide open," German gähnen "to yawn"), from PIE root *ghieh- "to yawn, gape, be wide open." Modern spelling is from 16c. Related: Yawned; yawning.

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agape (adv.)
"with the mouth wide open" (as in wonder), 1660s, from a- (1) + gape (v.).
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gaping (adj.)
"standing wide open," 1570s (implied in gapingly), present-participle adjective from gape (v.).
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CinemaScope (n.)

1953, proprietary name for wide-screen movie technology; see cinema + scope (n.2).

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gasp (v.)
late 14c., gaspen, "open the mouth wide; exhale," of uncertain origin, perhaps from Old Norse geispa "to yawn," or its Danish cognate gispe "gasp," which probably are related to Old Norse gapa "open the mouth wide" (see gap (n.)). Related: Gasped; gasping.
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Panavision (n.)

1955, proprietary name of a type of wide-screen lens, a word formed from elements of panorama + vision.

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en (n.)
name of the letter "N;" in printing (1793), a space half as wide as an em.
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Rehoboth 

Biblical place name, Hebrew Rehobhoth, literally "wide places" (Genesis xxvi.22).

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