Etymology
Advertisement
showgirl (n.)
"actress whose role is decorative rather than histrionic" [OED], 1836, from show (v.) + girl.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
bookbinder (n.)
"one whose occupation is the binding of books," late 14c, from book (n.) + binder. Related: Bookbindery.
Related entries & more 
dressmaker (n.)

also dress-maker, "one whose occupation is the making of articles of feminine attire," 1803, from dress (n.) + maker.

Related entries & more 
dyer (n.)

"one whose occupation is to dye cloths, skins, etc.," mid-14c. (mid-13c. as a surname), agent noun from dye (v.).

Related entries & more 
milkweed (n.)
1590s, from milk (n.) + weed (n.); used in reference to various plants whose juice resembles milk.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
longshoreman (n.)
"stevedore, one whose work is loading and unloading ships," 1811, from shortening of alongshore "existing or employed along a shore or coast" + man (n.).
Related entries & more 
baseman (n.)
in baseball, player whose defensive position is at one of the three bases, by 1857, from base (n.) + man (n.).
Related entries & more 
re-enactor (n.)

1965, agent noun from re-enact (v.). Specifically, "one whose hobby or profession is to embody accurate historical presentation" by 1984, American English.

Related entries & more 
Thrace 
Greek Thrake, named for the people who inhabited it, whose name is of unknown origin, perhaps Semitic. Related: Thracian.
Related entries & more 
pacer (n.)

1660s, "a horse whose natural gait is a pace," agent noun from pace (v.). As "one who measures by pacing," by 1835.

Related entries & more 

Page 2