Etymology
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mandatary (n.)

"person to whom a mandate has been given, one who receives a command or charge," 1610s, from Late Latin mandatarius "one to whom a charge or commission has been given," from Latin mandatus, past participle of mandare "to order, commit to one's charge" (see mandate (n.)).

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obligee (n.)

in law, "person to whom another is bound by contract," 1570s, from oblige + -ee.

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grantee (n.)
in legal language, "person to whom a thing is granted," late 15c., from grant (v.) + -ee.
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transferee (n.)
1736, "one to whom a transfer is made;" 1890s as "one who is transferred;" from transfer (v.) + -ee.
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mortgagee (n.)

"one to whom property is mortgaged, one who lends money on mortgage," 1580s, from mortgage (v.) + -ee.

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whereupon (conj.)

"upon which or whom," c. 1300, from where (in the sense of "in which position or circumstances") + upon.

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committee (n.)

late 15c., "person appointed to attend to any business, person to whom something is committed," from Anglo-French commite; see commit + -ee.

From 1620s as "body of persons, appointed or elected, to whom some special business or function has been entrusted;" a new formation or else an extended sense of the old noun. Related: Committeeman; committeeship.

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Alexandria 
city in Egypt, founded 332 B.C.E. by Alexander the Great, for whom it is named. Also see -ia. Related: Alexandrian.
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cui bono 

a Latin phrase from Cicero. It means "to whom for a benefit," or "who profits by it?" not "to what good purpose? for what use or end?" as is sometimes said. From cui "to? for whom?," an old form preserved here in the dative form of the interrogative pronoun quis "who?" (from PIE root *kwo-, stem of relative and interrogative pronouns) + bono "good" (see bene-).

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stake-holder (n.)

also stakeholder, 1708, "one with whom bets are deposited when a wager is made," from stake (n.2) + agent noun from hold (v.). Originally one with whom bets are deposited when a wager is made. By 1965 as "one who has something to gain or lose" (in a business, etc.), "one who has an interest in" (something).

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