Etymology
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dish-cloth (n.)

also dishcloth, "cloth for washing dishes," 1828, from dish (n.) + cloth. It relegated earlier dish-clout (1520s) to dialect. Dish-rag is by 1839. All have been taken as types of limpness or weakness. Dish-mop, "bundle of threads or cloth scraps fixed securely on a stick," used when the dish-waster is hotter than the hands can bear, is by 1856.

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whole nine yards (n.)
by 1970, of unknown origin; perhaps arbitrary (see cloud nine). Among the guesses that have been made without real evidence: concrete mixer trucks were said to have dispensed in this amount. Or the yard might be the word used in the slang sense of "one hundred dollars." Several similar phrases meaning "everything" arose in the 1940s (whole ball of wax, which is likewise of obscure origin, whole schmear); older examples include whole hog (see hog (n.)) and whole shooting match (1896); whole shebang (1895).
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drapery (n.)

early 14c., draperie, "cloth, textiles," from Old French draperie (12c.) "weaving, cloth-making, clothes shop," from drap "cloth, piece of cloth" (see drape (v.)). From late 14c. as "place where cloth is made; cloth market." Meaning "stuff with which something is draped" is from 1680s.

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tablecloth (n.)
also table-cloth, "cloth for covering the top of a table," mid-15c., from table (n.) + cloth.
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broadcloth (n.)
also broad-cloth, "fine woolen cloth used in making men's garments," early 15c., from broad (adj.) + cloth (n.). So called from its width (usually 60 inches).
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map (n.)

"drawing upon a plane surface representing a part or whole of the earth's surface or the heavens, with the various points drawn in proportion and in corresponding positions," 1520s, a shortening of Middle English mapemounde "map of the world" (late 14c.), and in part from French mappe, shortening of Old French mapemonde. Both the fuller English and French words are from Medieval Latin mappa mundi "map of the world."

The first element is from Latin mappa "napkin, cloth" (on which maps were drawn), "tablecloth, signal-cloth, flag," said by Quintilian to be of Punic (Semitic) origin (compare Talmudic Hebrew mappa, contraction of Mishnaic menaphah "a fluttering banner, streaming cloth"). The second element is Latin mundi "of the world," from mundus "universe, world" (see mundane).

Commonly used 17c. in a figurative sense of "epitome; detailed representation of anything." To put (something) on the map "bring it to wide attention" is from 1913.

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loden (n.)
"coarse woolen cloth," 1880, from German loden "thick woolen cloth."
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haircloth (n.)
cloth made from the shorter hairs of animals, early 15c., from hair + cloth.
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wholehearted (adj.)
also whole-hearted, 1840, from whole (adj.) + -hearted. Related: Wholeheartedly.
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integral (adj.)

late 15c., "of or pertaining to a whole; intrinsic, belonging as a part to a whole," from Old French intégral (14c.), from Medieval Latin integralis "forming a whole," from Latin integer "whole" (see integer). Related: Integrally. As a noun, 1610s, from the adjective.

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