Etymology
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sopping (adj.)
"very wet," 1877, from sop (v.) "to drench with moisture" (1680s), from sop (n.).
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damp (adj.)

1580s, "dazed," from damp (n.). Meaning "slightly wet" is from 1706. Related: Damply; dampness.

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moil (v.)

c. 1400, "to wet, moisten," from Old French moillier "to wet, moisten" (12c., Modern French mouiller), from Vulgar Latin *molliare, from Latin mollis "soft," from PIE root *mel- (1) "soft." Sense of "drudge, labor, toil" (1540s) probably is via the notion of "to labor in dirt or mire." Related: Moiled; moiling.

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soupy (adj.)
"like soup; wet," 1828 (noted then as a Yorkshire word), from soup (n.) + -y (2). Related: Soupiness.
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draggle (v.)

"to wet or befoul a garment by allowing it to drag along damp ground or mud," 1510s, frequentative of drag (v.); also see -el (3). This led to draggle-tail "sloppy woman, woman whose skirts are wet and draggled" (1590s). Related: Draggled; draggling.

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hygrometer (n.)
"instrument for measuring atmospheric moisture," 1660s, from French hygromètre, from Greek hygro- "wet, moist; moisture" (see hygro-) + -meter. Related: Hygrometry; hygrometric.
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soppy (adj.)

"very wet," 1823, from sop + -y (2). Meaning "sentimental" is attested by 1918. Related: Soppiness.

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imbue (v.)
early 15c., "to keep wet; to soak, saturate;" also figuratively "to cause to absorb" (feelings, opinions, etc.), from Latin imbuere "moisten, wet, soak, saturate," figuratively "to fill; to taint," a word of uncertain origin, perhaps from the same root as imbrication. Compare also Old French embu, past participle of emboivre, from Latin imbibere "drink in, soak in" (see imbibe), which might have influenced the English word. Related: Imbued; imbuing.
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undulant (adj.)
1830, from Latin undulantem (nominative undulans), from unda "a wave," from PIE *unda-, nasalized form of root *wed- (1) "water; wet."
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moist (adj.)

late 14c., "slightly wet; well-irrigated, characterized by moistness," from Old French moiste "damp, wet, soaked" (13c., Modern French moite), which is of uncertain origin. Perhaps from Vulgar Latin *muscidus "moldy," also "wet," from Latin mucidus "slimy, moldy, musty," from mucus "slime" (see mucus). Alternative etymology [Diez] is from Latin musteus "fresh, green, new," literally "like new wine," from musteum "new wine" (see must (n.1)). If this wasn't the source, it influenced the form of the other word in Old French. Related: Moistly; moistness (mid-14c.).

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