Etymology
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hygro- 
word-forming element meaning "wet, moist; moisture," from Greek hygros "wet, moist, fluid; weak, soft, flexible." Beekes says possible cognates include Old Norse vokr (accusative vokvan) "moist, wet;" Latin uvidus, udus.
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ooze (n.)

"fine soft mud or slime," Old English wase "soft mud, mire," from Proto-Germanic *waison (source also of Old Saxon waso "wet ground, mire," Old Norse veisa "pond of stagnant water"), probably from a PIE root meaning "wet." Modern spelling is from mid-1500s.

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sopping (adj.)
"very wet," 1877, from sop (v.) "to drench with moisture" (1680s), from sop (n.).
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damp (adj.)

1580s, "dazed," from damp (n.). Meaning "slightly wet" is from 1706. Related: Damply; dampness.

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moil (v.)

c. 1400, "to wet, moisten," from Old French moillier "to wet, moisten" (12c., Modern French mouiller), from Vulgar Latin *molliare, from Latin mollis "soft," from PIE root *mel- (1) "soft." Sense of "drudge, labor, toil" (1540s) probably is via the notion of "to labor in dirt or mire." Related: Moiled; moiling.

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soupy (adj.)
"like soup; wet," 1828 (noted then as a Yorkshire word), from soup (n.) + -y (2). Related: Soupiness.
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draggle (v.)

"to wet or befoul a garment by allowing it to drag along damp ground or mud," 1510s, frequentative of drag (v.); also see -el (3). This led to draggle-tail "sloppy woman, woman whose skirts are wet and draggled" (1590s). Related: Draggled; draggling.

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masto- 

before vowels mast-, word-forming element meaning "female breast, mammary gland," from Greek mastos "woman's breast," from madan "to be wet, to flow," from PIE *mad- "wet, moist, dripping" (source also of Latin madere "be moist;" Albanian mend "suckle;" see mast (n.2)).

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hygrometer (n.)
"instrument for measuring atmospheric moisture," 1660s, from French hygromètre, from Greek hygro- "wet, moist; moisture" (see hygro-) + -meter. Related: Hygrometry; hygrometric.
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soppy (adj.)

"very wet," 1823, from sop + -y (2). Meaning "sentimental" is attested by 1918. Related: Soppiness.

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