Etymology
Advertisement
Brythonic (adj.)

"of the (Celtic) Britons, Welsh," 1884, from Welsh Brython, cognate with English Briton, both from Latin Britto. Introduced into modern English by Welsh Celtic scholar Professor John Rhys (1840-1915) to avoid the confusion of using Briton/British with reference to ancient peoples, religions, and languages.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
tref (n.)

Welsh, literally "hamlet, home, town," from PIE *treb- "dwelling" (see tavern).

Related entries & more 
wrasse (n.)

type of salt-water fish, 1670s, from Cornish wrach, related to Welsh gurach.

Related entries & more 
lech (n.1)

"Celtic monumental stone," 1768, from Welsh llech, cognate with Gaelic and Irish leac (see cromlech).

Related entries & more 
cwm (n.)

"bowl-shaped hollow at the head of a valley," 1853, from Welsh cwm "coomb" (see coomb). Mostly they are formed by glaciers.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
whop (v.)

"to beat, strike," mid-15c., of imitative origin. Compare Welsh chwap "a stroke," also of imitative origin; also see wap. Related: Whopped; whopping.

Related entries & more 
flannel (n.)

"warm, loosely woven woolen stuff," c. 1300, flaunneol, probably related to Middle English flanen "sackcloth" (c. 1400); by Skeat and others traced to Welsh gwlanen "woolen cloth," from gwlan "wool," from Celtic *wlana, from PIE *wele- (1) "wool" (see wool). "As flannel was already in the 16th c. a well-known production of Wales, a Welsh origin for the word seems antecedently likely" [OED].

The Welsh origin is not a universally accepted etymology, due to the sound changes involved; Barnhart, Gamillscheg, Diez suggest the English word is from an Anglo-French diminutive of Old French flaine "a kind of coarse wool." Modern French flanelle is a 17c. borrowing from English.

Related entries & more 
inch (n.2)

"small Scottish island," early 15c., from Gaelic innis (genitive innse) "island," from Celtic *inissi (source also of Old Irish inis, Welsh ynys, Breton enez).

Related entries & more 
lough (n.)

"a lake, pool," early 14c., Anglo-Celtic, representing a northern form of Irish and Gaelic loch, Welsh llwch, from PIE *laku- (see lake (n.1), and compare loch).

Related entries & more 
corgi (n.)

"breed of short-legged dog originally bred in Wales for herding cattle," 1921, from Welsh corgi, from cor "dwarf" + ci "dog" (from PIE root *kwon- "dog").

Related entries & more 

Page 2