Etymology
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espousal (n.)
late 14c., from Old French esposailles (plural) "act of betrothal" (12c., Modern French époussailles), from Latin sponsalia "betrothal, espousal, wedding," noun use of neuter plural of sponsalis "of a betrothal," from sponsa "spouse" (see espouse). For the -e- see e-. Figuratively, of causes, principles, etc., from 1670s.
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agamist (n.)
"a celibate, one who does not marry or refuses to marry," 1550s, with -ist + Greek agamos "unmarried," from a- "not" (see a- (3)) + gamos "marriage, a wedding" (see gamete).
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bridal (adj.)

"belonging to a bride or a wedding," c. 1200, transferred use of noun bridal "wedding feast," Old English brydealo "marriage feast," from bryd ealu, literally "bride ale" (see bride + ale); the second element later was confused with suffix -al (1), especially after c. 1600. Compare scot-ale under scot (n.) and Middle English scythe-ale (mid-13c.) "drinking celebration for mowers, as compensation for a particular job." Bridal-suite is by 1857.

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prothalamion (n.)

"song sung before a wedding, piece written to celebrate a marriage," 1590s, coined as a poem title ("Prothalamion, or a Spousall Verse") by Edmund Spenser (based on epithalamion) from Greek pro "before" (see pro-) + thalamos "bridal chamber" (see thalamus). Sometimes Latinized as prothalamium.

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mariachi (n.)
"Mexican strolling musical band," 1941, from Mexican Spanish, from French mariage "marriage" (see marriage), so called because such bands performed at wedding celebrations. As an adjective by 1967.
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triple (adj.)
early 15c., from Old French triple or directly from Latin triplus "threefold, triple," from tri- "three" (see tri-) + -plus "-fold" (see -plus). As a noun, early 15c., "a triple sum or quantity," from the adjective. The baseball sense of "a three-base hit" is attested from 1880. Related: Triply (adv.). Triple-decker is from 1940 of sandwiches and wedding cakes, 1942 of beds.
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shotgun (n.)

1821, American English, from shot (n.) in the sense of "lead in small pellets" (1770) + gun (n.). As distinguished from a rifle, which fires bullets. Shotgun wedding is attested by 1903, American English. To ride shotgun is by 1905, from custom of having an armed man beside the driver on the stagecoach in the Old West to ward off trouble.

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rehearsal (n.)

late 14c., rehersaille, "restatement, repetition of the words of another; account, narration," from rehearse + -al (2), or from Old French rehearsal "a repeating." Sense in theater and music, "act or process of studying by practice or preparatory exercise, a meeting of musical or dramatic performers for practice and study together" is from 1570s. A play being in rehearsal is from 1709. Pre-wedding rehearsal dinner attested by 1953.

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nuptial (adj.)

"of or pertaining to marriage or the wedding ceremony," late 15c., from French nuptial, or directly from Latin nuptialis "pertaining to marriage," from nuptiae "a wedding," from nupta, fem. past participle of nubere "to marry, get married, wed, take as a husband," which is of uncertain origin. Perhaps it is from a PIE root *sneubh- "to marry, wed" (source also of Old Church Slavonic snubiti "to love, woo," Czech snoubiti "to seek in marriage," Slovak zasnubit "to betroth"). De Vaan finds the old theory that the verb nubere is literally "to cover, veil oneself" (as a bride) semantically attractive but unproven (compare Latin obnubere "to veil, cover the head," from nubes "cloud"). Related: Nuptially.

Nuptial number, a number obscurely described at the beginning of the eighth book of the "Republic" of Plato, and said to preside over the generation of men. The number meant may be 864. [Century Dictionary]
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Danaid (n.)

in Greek mythology, one of the 50 daughters of Danaus, king of Argos, from Greek Danaides (plural). On command of their father, all (except Hypermnestra) killed their husbands on their wedding night and consequently were condemned in Hades to draw water perpetually in bottomless buckets. Hence often in reference to endless, futile labor. Related: Danaidean.

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