Etymology
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water-closet (n.)

"privy with a waste-pipe and means to carry off the discharge by a flush of water," 1755, from water (n.1) + closet (n.).

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water-ski (n.)

1931, from water (n.1) + ski (n.). As a verb from 1953.

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salt water (n.)

"the sea; naturally occurring salt water," late Old English sealtera watera. As an adjective from 1520s, "inhabiting salt water or the sea." Salt-water taffy attested by 1886; so called because it originally was sold at seashore resorts, especially Atlantic City, N.J. (see taffy).

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ice-water (n.)

"water from melted ice; water cooled by ice," 1722, from ice (n.) + water (n.1).

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hot water (n.)

c. 1400, literal; 1530s in figurative sense of "trouble." See hot (adj.) + water (n.1). Hot-water bottle is from 1895.

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rose-water (n.)

late 14c., "water tinctured with oil of roses by distillation," from rose (n.1) + water (n.1). Symbolic of affected delicacy or sentimentalism. Similar formation in Middle Dutch rosenwater, Dutch rozenwater, German Rosenwasser.

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water-ice (n.)

"sugared water, flavored and frozen," 1818, from water (n.1) + ice (n.).

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water-pipe (n.)

c. 1400, "conduit for water," from water (n.1) + pipe (n.1). The smoking sense is attested by 1824.

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fresh-water (adj.)

also freshwater, "pertaining to, produced by, living in, or situated on water that is not salt," 1520s, from fresh (adj.1) + water (n.1).

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