Etymology
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vast (adj.)

1570s, "being of great extent or size," from French vaste, from Latin vastus "immense, extensive, huge," also "desolate, unoccupied, empty." The two meanings probably originally attached to two separate words, one with a long -a- one with a short -a-, that merged in early Latin (see waste (v.)). Meaning "very great in quantity or number" is from 1630s; that of "very great in degree" is from 1670s. Very popular early 18c. as an intensifier. Related: Vastly; vastness; vasty.

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*eue- 
*euə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to leave, abandon, give out," with derivatives meaning "abandoned, lacking, empty."

It forms all or part of: avoid; devastation; devoid; evacuate; evanescent; vacant; vacate; vacation; vacuity; vacuole; vacuous; vacuum; vain; vanish; vanity; vaunt; void; wane; want; wanton; waste.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit una- "deficient;" Avestan va- "lack," Persian vang "empty, poor;" Armenian unain "empty;" Latin vacare "to be empty," vastus "empty, waste," vanus "empty, void," figuratively "idle, fruitless;" Old English wanian "to lessen," wan "deficient;" Old Norse vanta "to lack."
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exhaust (n.)

"waste gas," 1848, originally from steam engines, from exhaust (v.). In reference to internal combustion engines by 1896. Exhaust pipe, which carries away waste gas or steam from an engine, is by 1849.

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ravage (v.)

"devastate, lay waste, despoil," 1610s, from French ravager "lay waste, devastate," from Old French ravage "destruction," especially by flood (14c.), from ravir "to take away hastily" (see ravish). Related: Ravaged; ravaging.

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moorland (n.)

"tract of waste land," Old English morlond; see moor (n.) + land (n.).

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atrophy (v.)
"to waste away," 1808, from atrophy (n.). Related: Atrophied; atrophying.
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emaciate (v.)
1620s "cause to lose flesh" (implied in emaciating), from Latin emaciatus, past participle of emaciare "make lean, cause to waste away," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + macies "leanness," from macer "thin" (from PIE root *mak- "long, thin"). Intransitive meaning "become lean, waste away" is from 1640s. Related: Emaciated.
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devastating (adj.)

1630s, "laying waste, ravaging," present-participle adjective from devastate. Trivial or hyperbolic use is by 1889.

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ineconomy (n.)
"waste of resources," 1881, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + economy (n.).
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bort (n.)
"waste diamonds, small chips from diamond-cutting," 1620s, of unknown origin, perhaps related to Old French bort "bastard."
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