Etymology
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arrest (n.)
"act of stopping; state of being stopped," late 14c., from Anglo-French arest, Old French areste (n.) "stoppage, delay" (12c., Modern French arrêt), from arester "to stay, stop" (see arrest (v.)). Especially in law, "the taking of a person into custody, usually by warrant from authority, to answer an alleged or suspected crime" (early 15c.).
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scurrilous (adj.)

"given to the use of low and indecent language," "using such language as only the licence of a buffoon can warrant" [Johnson], 1570s, from scurrile "coarsely joking" (implied in scurrility), from Latin scurrilis "buffoon-like," from scurra "fashionable city idler, man-about-town," later "buffoon." According to Klein's sources, "an Etruscan loan-word." Related: Scurrilously; scurrilousness. As a verb, scurrilize was tried (c. 1600).

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attachment (n.)
c. 1400, "arrest of a person on judicial warrant" (mid-13c. in Anglo-Latin), from Anglo-French attachement, from Old French attacher "to attach" (see attach). Application to property (including, later, wages) dates from 1590s; meaning "sympathy, devotion" is recorded from 1704; that of "something that is attached to something else" dates from 1797 and has become very common since the rise of e-mail.
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guaranty (n.)
"act or fact of guaranteeing, a being answerable for the obligations of another," 1590s, garrantye, from earlier garant "warrant that the title to a property is true" (see guarantee (n.)), with influence from Old French garantie "protection, defense; safeguard, warranty," originally past participle of garantir "to protect," from the same source. The sense of "pledge given as security" that developed 17c. in guarantee might reasonably have left the sense "act of guaranteeing" to this form of the word, but the forms remain confused.
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guarantee (n.)

1670s, "person that gives security," altered (perhaps via Spanish garante or confusion with legalese ending -ee), from earlier garrant "warrant that the title to a property is true" (early 15c.), from Old French garant "defender, protector; warranty; pledge; justifying evidence," from a Germanic source, from Proto-Germanic *war- "to warn, guard, protect," from PIE root *wer- (4) "to cover." For form evolution, see gu-. Sense of the "pledge" itself (which is properly a guaranty) developed 18c.

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replevin (n.)

in law, "recovery of goods (by someone) taken from him, upon posting of security; temporary restoration of confiscated property pending a legal hearing," mid-15c., from Anglo-French replevin (mid-14c.) and Anglo-Latin (13c.) replevina, from Old French replevir (v.) "to pledge, protect, warrant," from re- "back, again" (see re-) + plevir, a word of uncertain origin; perhaps related to pledge (v.). The corresponding verb is replevy (1550s). Related: Repleviable.

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alky (n.)

also alchy, 1841, "an alcoholic drink" (also "alcoholic drink personified"), a slang shortening of alcoholic liquor first attested in temperance publications. As "a drunkard" (short for alcoholic (n.)) it is suggested by 1888.

"What is his name?"
"Hall is his real name; but they call him Alky, because he drinks — Alky Hall; alcohol, you know. But he's given up drinking now, since I told him about temperance and lent him my Sargent's 'Temperance Tales.' I'll warrant you he'll never drink another drop." [Joseph Kirkland, "The McVeys," 1888] 
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beadle (n.)
Old English bydel "herald, messenger from an authority, preacher," from Proto-Germanic *budilaz "herald" (source also of Dutch beul, Old High German butil, German Büttel "herald"), from PIE root *bheudh- "be aware, make aware."

Related to Old English beodan "to proclaim" (see bid (v.)). Sense of "warrant officer, tipstaff" was in late Old English; that of "petty parish officer," which has given the job a bad reputation, is from 1590s. French bédeau (Old French bedel, 12c.), Spanish bedel, Italian bidello are Germanic loan-words.
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boatswain (n.)

mid-15c., from late Old English batswegen, from bat "boat" (see boat (n.)) + Old Norse sveinn "boy" (see swain).

BOATSWAIN. The warrant officer who in the old Navy was responsible for all the gear that set the ship in motion and all the tackle that kept her at rest. [Sir Geoffrey Callender, "Sea Passages," 1943]

He also summons the hands to their duties with a silver whistle. Phonetic spelling bo'sun/bosun is attested from 1840. Fowler [1926] writes, "The nautical pronunciation (bō'sn) has become so general that to avoid it is more affected than to use it."

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search (n.)

c. 1400, serche, "act of searching; a seeking or looking; a search through an area or a place; examination of records, wills, etc.;" early 15c., "right to investigate illegal activity;" from Anglo-French serche, Old French cerche "investigation," from cerchier (see search (v.)).

Search-warrant , granted by authority to a constable to enter premises of suspected persons (originally especially to recover stolen goods) is attested from 1739. Search-party "party engaged in seeking for something lost" is by 1854 (in Elisha Kent Kane's account of the U.S. expedition seeking Sir John Franklin).

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