Etymology
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windward (adj.)
"on the side toward which the wind blows," 1540s, from wind (n.1) + -ward.
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offward (adv.)

"in a direction or position away from (something)," c. 1600, from off (prep.) + -ward.

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leftward (adv.)
"to or toward the left or the left-hand side," late 15c., from left (adj.) + -ward. Related: Leftwards.
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eastward (adv.)
also eastwards, Old English eastwearde; see east + -ward. As an adjective mid-15c., from the adverb.
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aftward (adv.)
Old English æftewearde; see aft + -ward. The original form of afterward (q.v.), retained in nautical use. Related: Aftwards.
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rightward (adv.)

"to or on the right hand," by 1814, from right (adj.2) + -ward. As an adjective, "tending to the right," by 1829. Related: Rightwards.

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wayward (adj.)
late 14c., shortening of aweiward "turned away," from way (adv.), shortening of away + -ward. Related: Waywardly; waywardness.
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toward (prep.)
Old English toweard "in the direction of," prepositional use of toweard (adj.) "coming, facing, approaching," from to (see to) + -ward.
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rearward (adv.)

"at or to the rear," 1590s, from rear (adj.) + -ward. It had been used in Middle English as a noun meaning "the part of an army behind the main body" (i.e. "rear guard").

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forward (adv.)
Old English forewearde "toward the front, in front; toward the future; at the beginning;" see fore + -ward. Adjectival sense of "early" is from 1520s; that of "presumptuous" is attested from 1560s. The Old English adjective meant "inclined to the front; early; former."
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