Etymology
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machine-shop (n.)

"workshop in which machines or parts of machines are made and repaired," 1827, from machine (n.) + shop (n.).

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inter-war (adj.)

1939, in reference to the period between the world wars, from inter- + war (n.).

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war-path (n.)

also warpath, 1775, in reference to North American Indians, from war (n.) + path (n.).

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anti-war (adj.)

also antiwar, "opposition to a war," 1812, American English, in reference to opposition to the War of 1812, from anti- + war (n.). In a non-specific sense of "political pacifism, opposition to all war," by 1821.

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man-of-war (n.)

late 14c., "a soldier;" see man (n.) + war (n.). Meaning "armed ship, vessel equipped for warfare" is from late 15c. Man in the sense of "a ship" is attested from late 15c. in combinations (such as merchantman). The sea creature known as the Portuguese man-of-war (1707) is so called for its sail-like crest. The great U.S. thoroughbred race horse was Man o' War (1917-1947).

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war-monger (n.)

also warmonger, 1580s, from war (n.) + monger (n.). First attested in Spenser's "Faerie Queene," and perhaps coined by him.

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civil war (n.)

"battles among fellow citizens or within a community," from civil in a sense of "occurring among fellow citizens" attested from late 14c. in batayle ciuile "civil battle," etc. The exact phrase civil war is attested from late 15c. (the Latin phrase was bella civicus). An Old English word for it was ingewinn. Ancient Greek had polemos epidemios.

Early use typically was in reference to ancient Rome. Later, in England, to the struggle between Parliament and Charles I (1641-1651); in U.S., to the War of Secession (1861-1865), an application often decried as wholly inaccurate but in use (among other names) in the North during the war and boosted by the popular "Battles and Leaders of the Civil War" series published 1884-87 in "Century Magazine."

"The war between the States," which a good many Southerners prefer, is both bookish and inexact. "Civil war" is an utter misnomer. It was used and is still used by courteous people, the same people who are careful to say "Federal" and "Confederate." "War of the rebellion," which begs the very question at issue, has become the official designation of the struggle, but has found no acceptance with the vanquished. To this day no Southerner uses it except by way of quotation .... "The war of secession" is still used a good deal in foreign books, but it has no popular hold. "The war," without any further qualification, served the turn of Thucydides and Aristophanes for the Peloponnesian war. It will serve ours, let it be hoped, for some time to come. [Basil L. Gildersleeve, "The Creed of the Old South," 1915]
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war-time (n.)

late 14c., from war (n.) + time (n.).

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sub-machine-gun (n.)

"light, portable machine gun," 1926, from sub- + machine-gun (n.).

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