Etymology
Advertisement
ford (v.)
"to cross a body of water by walking on the bottom," 1610s, from ford (n.). Related: Forded; fording.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
footprint (n.)

"the mark of a foot," especially in walking, 1550s, from foot (n.) + print (n.). Related: Footprints. Old English had fotspor, fotswæð.

Related entries & more 
halting (n.)
"act of limping or walking lamely," late 14c., earlier haltinde (early 14c.), verbal noun from halt (v.2). Related: Haltingly.
Related entries & more 
clump (v.2)

"walk heavily and clumsily," 1660s, imitative, or perhaps from the notion of walking in wooden shoes (see clump (n.)). Related: Clumped; clumping.

Related entries & more 
leg-work (n.)
also legwork, 1891, from leg (n.) + work (n.). Originally news reporter slang for an assignment that promised more walking than copy.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
walk-through (n.)
also walkthrough, 1944, "an easy part" (in a theatrical production), from walk (v.) + through. Meaning "dry run, full rehearsal" is from 1959, from the notion of "walking (someone) through" something.
Related entries & more 
gang-plank (n.)
also gangplank, 1842, American English, from gang in its nautical sense of "a path for walking, passage" (see gangway) + plank. Replacing earlier gang-board.
Related entries & more 
fire-walker (n.)

one who walks barefoot over hot coals without injury, as an entertainment, etc., 1895, from fire (n.) + agent noun from walk (v.). Related: Fire-walking.

Related entries & more 
solvitur ambulando 
an appeal to practical experience for a solution or proof, Latin, literally "(the problem) is solved by walking," originally in reference to the proof by Diogenes the Cynic of the possibility of motion.
Related entries & more 
ambulatory (n.)
"part of a building intended for walking," 1620s, from Medieval Latin ambulatorium, from Latin ambulatorius "movable, of or pertaining to a walker," from ambulare "to walk, go about" (see amble (v.)).
Related entries & more 

Page 2