Etymology
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walkabout (n.)
"periodic migration by a westernized Aboriginal into the bush," 1828, Australian English, from walk (v.) + about.
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spacewalk (n.)
also space-walk, 1965, from space (n.) + walk (n.).
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fire-walker (n.)

one who walks barefoot over hot coals without injury, as an entertainment, etc., 1895, from fire (n.) + agent noun from walk (v.). Related: Fire-walking.

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crosswalk (n.)

also cross-walk, 1744 a type of garden path that crosses others; 1853 as "pedestrian crossing," from cross- + walk (n.).

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boardwalk (n.)
"walkway made of boards," 1864, American English, from board (n.1) + walk (n.). As a seaside attraction from 1881, first in reference to Atlantic City, N.J.
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walk-over (n.)
"easy victory," 1838, such as one that happens in the absence of competitors, when the solitary starter, being obliged to complete the event, can traverse the course at a walk. Transferred sense of "anything accomplished with great ease" is attested from 1902. To walk (all) over (someone) "treat with contempt" is from 1851.
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moonwalk (n.)

1966, "a walking on the moon," from moon (n.) + walk (n.). As a dance move in which the dancer  moves backward while appearing to walk forward it was popularized 1983 by Michael Jackson. 

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catwalk (n.)

1874, "long, narrow footway," from cat (n.) + walk (n.); in reference to such narrowness of passage that one has to cross as a cat walks. Originally especially of ships and theatrical back-stages; application to fashion show runways is by 1942.

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sidewalk (n.)

"path for pedestrians on the side of a street," 1721, from side (adj.) + walk (n.). The use of sidewalk for pavement as one of the characteristic differences between American and British English has been noted at least since 1902.

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walking (adj.)
c. 1400, present-participle adjective from walk (v.). Walking sickness, one in which the sufferer is able to get about and is not bed-ridden, is from 1846. Walking wounded is recorded from 1917. Walking bass is attested from 1939 in jazz slang. Walking stick is recorded from 1570s; the insect so called from 1760, for resemblance of shape.
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